Class Notes (835,133)
Canada (508,952)
Brock University (12,083)
Lecture 6

Lecture 6 (February 13).docx

11 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide Ruth Goodman ­ “Healthy, independent Vancouver senior commits suicide in bid to change right to die law” Statistical Issues ­ WHO estimates 1 million suicides a year ­ 13  leading cause of death worldwide ­ More prevalent among youth (15­24%) ­ 4  leading cause of death for youth  ­ Modernization factor  ▯modernization makes it more difficult for people to be connected and secure  within a predictable society ­ Canadian stats show: ­ For females, the highest rate of suicide is from 40­59 because of hormonal and life changes  ­ In 2009, 5.3 females per 100 000 killed themselves (highest group is 50­54) ­ For exam, you wouldn’t be asked to remember the stats but if you were told a stat in class it’s fair  game ­ For males, the rate is significantly higher than females and the highest rate is also from 40­59  ­ In 2009, 17.9 males per 100 000 killed themselves (highest group 85­89) Suicide in the United States ­ 33 000 deaths per year ­ Approximately 90 suicides per day ­ Ranks 11  as leading cause of death ­ All suicides may not be reported ­ Many people also find it difficult that a child is capable of killing themselves, so the stats may be  lower because of this ­ Many people may do something to kill themselves but it may be reported as something else ­ Many elderly commit suicide and they are assumed to have died of natural causes ­ Highest suicide rate is elderly men (75+) ­ Out number females 4:1 ­ For every male that commits suicide, 3 females attempt suicide 1 Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide ­ 8 million Americans consider suicide each year  Suicide Patterns in the United States 1. Complicated suicides occur most often among white males ­ They are at a greater risk than women or non­white males ­ White male suicide rates increase in age, but women and non­white males reach their peak in early  adult life 2. The white male suicide rate increases with age, but females and non­white males reach their peak  vulnerability earlier in adult life 3. The male suicide burden encompasses American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Hispanic populations –  but not Black, Asian, and Pacific Islanders 4. Suicide remains the third leading cause of death among youth (age 15­24) ­ This rate is higher because they don’t have other ailments that would take their life 5. Bad economic times are usually associated with an increase in suicide rates ­ Suicide peak occurred in Great Depression  ­ The recession also caused that 6. The suicide rate is higher among people who: a) Suffer from depression or other psychiatric problems b) Use alcohol while depressed c) Suffer from physical, especially irreversible illness d) Deal with challenges and frustrations in an impulsive way e) Are divorced f) Have lost an important relationship through death or breakup g) Live in certain areas of the country  ­ Rural areas have higher rates Example  ▯Wyoming, Alaska ­ Due to lack of social rapport and connectedness  ­ Suicide is often an impulsive act and alcohol is a factor at all ages Types of Suicide 2 Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide 1. Reunion = with the lost one, way to join the deceased ­ Children are particularly vulnerable to this ­ The parent or the older sibling that has gone to heaven, they want to be with them ­ Some adults remain childlike with their dependency on others and they feel the same one ­ Most likely when a person lacks a fully developed sense of selfhood and the death has removed a  significant source of support  2. Rest and refuge = way out of a burdensome and depressing situation, 3. Getting back = a way of getting back and expressing resentment and being hurt  4. Penalty for failure = response to not meeting one’s expectations or those of others 5. Mistake = attempt was made as a cry for help, but there was no rescue or intervention so the result is  death  Suicide Among Ethnic and Racial Minorities 1. Native Americans ­ “Indigenous populations” or “first people” or “aboriginals” ­ Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1985) – cause of suicide – “collective despair or lack of  hope” ­ The rate is exceptionally high (19.3%) ­ Tribal differences in suicide rates are large and also vary over time ­ Alcohol is a major factor in Native American suicide (over 2/3s of suicides in New Mexico) ­ Unlike the general population, it is among the young native Alaskans that depression, alcoholism, and  suicide are at peak levels: they are caught between two cultures, neither which are adequately  supportive ­ Here women tend to have suicidal thoughts over a large period of time  ­ The average life expectancy remains relatively low for Native Americans ­ Elderly Natives not likely to commit suicide (opposite of white groups)  2. African Americans ­ One would expect the suicide rates to be higher among this group because of struggles and racism  ­ Lower suicide rates than white majority ­ Religious belief and social support 3 Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide ­ Suicide is regarded as a failure of faith so it is less apparent because they are very religious and have  social support 3. Hispanic  ­ Only recently been given attention ­ 40 million in USA ­ Suicide rates have been traditionally low, but now is rising  ­ There is distress and suicide among Hispanic youth ­ Grade 9 Hispanic females – 40% thought of ending their lives and 1/5 had a suicide attempt 4. Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders ­ 6% of population and growing ­ More than 40 ethnic groups ­ Little statistical data ­ Thought to have lower suicide rates ­ However, elderly Asian women have higher suicide rates ­ PTSD rates are high in Asians  United States Death Rates Ethnic Group Females Males African American 1.4 9.4 White 5.1 19.6 Hispanic 1.8 8.8 American Indian 5.1 18.3 Alaska Native  Pacific Islander 3.4 7.9 Explanatory Models of Suicide 1. Sociological model  ▯Emile Durkheim ­ In 1897, he wrote Suicide: A Study in Sociology 4 Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide ­ One of his goals was to establish sociology as a major field  ­ There were four types of suicide a) Egotistic = committed by people who do not have enough involvement in society ­ Occurs as an individual’s heightened sense of isolation and social detachment ­ Not under sufficient cultural control (people who make their own rules) Example  ▯celebrities, intellectuals b) Altruistic suicide = occurs when the individual has an excessive concern for society ­ Less common in western suicide Example  ▯soldier who participates in suicide bombing, when someone goes on a hunger strike c) Anomic = social breakdown is reflected most here, people are cast aside by the failure of social  institutions Example  ▯unemployment (person fired has lost a significant tie to suicide)  ­ When the rupture between an individual and society is sudden, then the probability of suicide is high Example  ▯death of a spouse  d) Fatalistic = occurs when a person is overcontrolled by society ­ Occurs in social settings where there is too much social regulation and little individual behaviour Example  ▯slavery  ­ Durkheim’s work was important for drawing attention to the social element in suicidal behaviour ­ Work is problematic because gives an incomplete picture (ignores the psychological factor and  doesn’t explain why some commit suicide and some don’t)s ­ Our society is individualistic and mobile, which can be very socially isolating and people can lack  stable social ties 2. Psychoanalytic approach to suicide  ▯Sigmond Freud ­ Suicidal individuals have murderous impulses toward another person that becomes self­directed Twin instinct theory = humans have two instinctive drives  ▯Eros (life instinct) and Thanatos (death  instinct), which constantly interact ­ Eros is the force leading to expansion, growth, and experience ­ Thanatos is the force that shuts down ourselves ­ These two interact ­ When thanatos is dominant, people are more likely to engage in self­destructive behaviour 5 Lecture 6 (Wednesday, February 13, 2013) – Suicide ­ Freud believes that both parents and the world punish outward aggression so it forces inwards ­ Other psychoanalysts believe that suicide can be traced to childhood with children who are criticized  and put down constantly ­ Family violence, severe marital discourse, and the loss of a parent can make a child vulnerable Aftermath of Suicide ­ The experience of bereavement can be extremely painful surviving relatives of a person who commits  suicide ­ Individuals may experience shame, guilt, confusion, and anger towards the deceased ­ Individuals may have ongoing sense of difficulty in developing close relationships ­ Suicide is usually sudden – an unexpected death, which makes grief or grieving difficult ­ The social stigma, which is attached to suicide, may make it difficult for survivors to talk about the  death – it may make it difficult to work through one’s grief ­ Society tends to blame surviving family memb
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit