Class Notes (837,693)
Canada (510,397)
Brock University (12,132)
Lecture 9

Lecture 9 (March 13).docx

9 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 9 (Wednesday, March 13, 2013) – Organ Transplantation  Review ­ Robert Katenbaum – death system ­ Had four components  1. People 2. Place 3. Time 4. Objects ­ Conditions that resemble death – inorganic and unresponsive; sleep and altered states of  consciousness ­ Social death – Robert Hertz ­ Respirator brain ­ Living cadavers  Margaret Lock ­ Japan/North America ­ Gift of life more common in western world ­ Arises from Christian tradition  ­ In Japan, giving organs to a stranger is a weird concept Twice dead = a term referring to how organ donors are seen as twice dead (original death then second  death) 1. First death occurs when they are brain dead 2. Second death occurs when their organs are removed ­ It is also possible for a person to be 3 times dead (stop breathing, then resuscitated, then brain dead) ­ Death is not isolated to any particular moment ­ In the western world, a person who is brain dead is simply just dead ­ In Japan, this is not the case ­ In Japan, there are more living donors than there are in the west  ­ In Japan, they depend on living organ donors compared to U.S. who rely on cadavers  1 Lecture 9 (Wednesday, March 13, 2013) – Organ Transplantation  Dr. Wada ­ Conducted the first heart transplant in Japan in 1967 ­ Charged with murder ­ These charges were later dropped in 1972 ­ The second heart transplant didn’t occur until 1999 Yanigida Case ­ A family dealing with the death of a man who committed suicide who was brought back to life and  placed on ventilators ­ Shortly after, he was labeled as brain dead ­ He died 3 times 1. Hanging self ­ Then brought back 2. Brain dead ­ Then biological death 3. Organs taken out Organ Transplantation Organ transplantation = the transfer of living tissues or cells from a donor to a recipient, with the  maintaining of the functional integrity of the transplanted tissue in the recipient ­ Significant events in the history of organ transplantation 1. 1954  ▯first living kidney transplant in Boston ­ From one identical twin to another ­ Has evolved to become a common practice in the U.S. 2. 1967  ▯first heart transplant by Christiaan Barnard, Cape Town, South Africa ­ This heightened public interest 3. 1968  ▯Harvard criteria ­ This was the agreement on brain death 4. 1968  ▯Uniform Anatomical Gift Act  2 Lecture 9 (Wednesday, March 13, 2013) – Organ Transplantation  ­ Described how organs could be used from an alive person or dead 5. 1976  ▯Cyclosporine Cyclosporine = a drug that is used to ensure transplant success and to reduce the side effects of  transplants ­ Enhances the ability to accept organs from a transplant without rejecting it  ­ Its acceptance is shown through the large waiting lists for transplants ­ The ideal candidate for a transplant is for a patient whose condition is deteriorating despite other  medical interventions and the transplant offers likely recovery for that person Transplant Restrictions 1. Willingness ­ People need to be willing to donate 2. Organ condition 3. Biological match ­ Between donor and recipient to avoid rejection 4. Condition of recipient ­ Whether the recipient is strong enough for survival with the new organ 5. Expense/delivery Living Donors ­ Organs are sometimes given by living people who are willing to give this gift ­ What is most often donated is a kidney  ­ Donations can be planned, they aren’t emergencies  ­ Most people donate organs to family members or other people that they know  ­ Anonymous donations are becoming common as well Cadaveric Donors ­ Primary sources are individuals involved in motor accidents ­ Also individuals who kill themselves with a gun shot to the head 3 Lecture 9 (Wednesday, March 13, 2013) – Organ Transplantation  Shortage… ­ Since there are enough donors it has caused competition  ­ Should the organ go to who is in most need? ­ Should it go to the person living in the local area in which the organ was received? Selling of Organs ­ Occurs frequently in Pakistan, India, and China ­ Those who can afford it, but it ­ Pakistan has a market for organs ­ Most people who sold an organ were illiterate and were in financial trouble ­ There are complications after giving an organ such as time of recovery Example  ▯17 year­old Wahn sold his organs for an iPad and phone ­ He did this secretly and was paid 2 000 pounds ­ The surgeon was paid 20 000 pounds ­ Last year, 5 people were charged in this case including the surgeon  ­ The organ transplant business is booming in China ­ More than a million people give away their organs in China yet less than 10% receive them known as  transplant tourism ­ Where they travel overseas and to black­markets or organs ­ Chinese people are less likely to give organs after death ­ Organ donations by people in jail is a completely different situation  ­ They find it a moral act to give your organs if you are in jail are going to be executed ­ It’s their way of giving one last thing to the world Questions  1. Approximately how many children in the United States are waiting for a transplant organ? a) 1 800 b) 2 500 c) 3 400 4 Lecture 9 (Wednesday, March 13, 2013) – Organ Transplantation  d) 10 200 ­ About 800 are on the waiting list for kidneys and 500 are on the waiting list for livers  2. Approximately how many heart transplants are performed in the United States each year? a) 500  b) 1 900 c) 2 300 d) 4 800 3. What is the age of the oldest organ donor in the United States? a) 55 b) 65 c) 72 d) 92 ­ She was a liver donor  ­ Almost anybody can do it at any age Some Facts – United States ­ In the U.S., there is another person put on the organ waiting list every 10 minutes ­ There are 120 000 people on that list ­ 18 people die each da
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit