Class Notes (836,414)
Canada (509,777)
Brock University (12,091)
Lecture 11

Lecture 11 (March 27).docx

6 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 11 (Wednesday, March 27, 2013) – Cemeteries and Memorials Review ­ Funerals ­ The emphasis is on the dead person ­ In contrast, in the West it is focused on the welfare of the survivors  ­ Social function of funerals ­ Elements of funeral rituals ­ 7 elements ­ Announcement of death  ­ Rise of funeral services in the United States  ­ New directions in funerals and body disposition  Caitlin Doughty ­ Founded Order of the Good Death in 2011 ­ She’s a licensed mortician and a writer ­ Attended the University of Chicago and completed a degree in Medieval History ­ Moved to California to apply for funeral homes ­ Her first job was as a crematory operatory ­ Since 2007, she has worked as a funeral arranger, body van driver, and she returned to school for a  mortuary license ­ Currently she works as a funeral director in Los Angeles  ­ “Ask a mortician” (web series) ­ You can write to her and ask her any question you have about death and dying and she will respond to  you ­ Can be found on Facebook and Twitter ­ Alkaline hydrolysis (video clip) Alkaline hydrolysis = form of body disposal, also known as liquid cremation, new type of body  disposal, heat+pressure+water+lye, what is left is ashes and liquid goo ­ The ashes are given back to family  ­ The liquid goes down the drain  ­ It is supposed to be a greener cremation because it causes less fossil fuel emission  1 ­ Only legal in 8 U.S. states ­ www.orderofthegooddeath.com  Relationships With The Death ­ The word cemetery is derived from a Greek word meaning “a sleeping place” ­ Initially in colonial America most of the dead were born in a church graveyard or family plots ­ Major changes in cemeteries occurred in the 19  century  ▯memorial parks, garden parks, landscapes  of memory  National cemeteries = honour those who died in war  ­ Cemeteries can tell us a lot about history ­ Grave markers, monuments  ▯burials ­ Inscription/plaque  ▯cremation  ­ Could be as big as the Taj Mahal ­ Famous dead people on stamps  ­ In some African communities, obituaries have turned into memorials  ­ Conventional forms of memorialization are not the only forms of memorial ­ A memorial maybe a keepsake, memento, memoir, or a sculpture  ­ The function of the memorial is to keep interest alive and keep remembrance  Death and Photography ­ Jay Ruby – Secure the Shadow: Death and Photography in America ­ Anthropologist who conducted a study about death and photography in 1888 onwards ­ Victorian custom that continues to be important today  ­ Photographing dead children common practice in the 19  and early 20  centuries ­ Infants died early and some people would lose 6 children  ­ Ruby said could help cope with the loss  ­ Socially/publicly death is denied and privately they didn’t want to deny it by using photos ­ Today there are many companies that provide this to many families ­ Pictures of a dead a means to mitigate death 2 Lecture 11 (Wednesday, March 27, 2013) – Cemeteries and Memorials Remembrance photography = one way that contemporary families cope with the loss of a baby, not so  different from Victorian times  ­ Sometimes the photos will appear on Facebook  New and Rediscovered Memorial Choices ­ Internet: “virtual cemeteries” or “virtual memorial gardens”  ▯provide space for photographs and  biographies, guests can sign guestbook and light candles ­ Pamela Roberts  ▯allows others to connect with those who have suffered a loss, web­based memorials  seem to supplement rather than replace traditional practices ­ Majority of them are devoted to deceased children  ­ Memorial pages on the Internet allow people to share their grief online ­ Facebook  ▯people often change their profile picture to one of the deceased person, they may start  Facebook groups in memory of someone, may post memories or pictures of the person, has become a  means of communicating with the dead and continue relations with the dead and to publicly express  one’s grief  ­ “Virtual eulogies”  ▯photographs and his/her life stories are displayed and can be displayed on a grave   through a grave marker, can contain 250 pages of information Cremation Jewelry ­ Memorialization  ­ Can put the ashes into the pendant  ­ Standard ­ Custom ­ Diamonds/crystals  ▯two styles of jewelry that are made out of the ashes  Wearable Tombstones ­ Memorialization  ­ T­shirts ­ Hoodies ­ Custom originated in New Orleans ­ Those who have died because of a crime or disease 3 Spontaneous Shrines ­ Performative commemoratives  ­ Coined by Jack Santino in 1992 when he was writing about street shrines in Northern Ir
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit