Class Notes (839,150)
Canada (511,218)
Brock University (12,137)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3 (June 25).docx

5 Pages
43 Views

Department
Religious Studies
Course Code
RELIGST 3C03
Professor
Liyakat Takim

This preview shows pages 1 and half of page 2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 3 (Monday, June 25, 2012) – Wahhabism ­ In 1895, Iran was closely affiliated to Britain and the Shah had drawn up an agreement where tobacco  would be sold very cheaply to Britain for certain favours Shah = king ­ This worked against the Iranian people because it was the property of the Iranian people ­ Afghani (he was against this trade) wrote to one of the Shi’ia Ullama, named Shirazi ­ He wrote a fatwa, which said that smoking tobacco was fighting against the messiah Fatwa = an opinion/statement ­ All of the tobacco warehouses were burnt and tobacco smoking was ceased  ­ The Shah’s wife wouldn’t let him smoke his hookah also  ­ This one statement from Shirazi made the Shah question his agreement with the British with regards  to tobacco  ­ Afghani in his own day was able to write to the uya’ullah and do this  ­ Towards the end of Afghani’s life, he lived in isolation and he was exiled again in Constatine Noble  ­ Afghani was pained and rejected by the sight of so much cowardance and Muslim decadence around  him  ­ In 1896, the Shah was assassinated and Afghani was implicated, he denied it but became very  vulnerable  ­ He died from chin cancer and he was buried in a cemetery but in 1944, his remains were taken from  Constantine Noble to Afghanistan (Kabul)  Abduh  ­ Wrote most of the “Indissolvable Link”  ­ He was Egyptian ­ He was born in 1849 and died in 1905  ­ Unlike Afghani, he was more mystically aligned (may be because he was born in a small Egyptian  village) ­ He was far more calm and serene, unlike Afghani ­ He was educated in Azhar, so he was well – established ­ Unlike Afghani, Abduh was Sunni  ­ Abduh had met Afghani  ­ In 1899, Abduh became a mufti 1 Lecture 3 (Monday, June 25, 2012) – Wahhabism Mufti = a person who has learned enough to make his own rulings (very prestigious status) ­ He was still very liberal  ­ He believed in the concept of rationalism and reasoning, he had studied western literature also ­ Abduh stated that reason is not against religions and that there is no contradiction between the two ­ Reasoning was an essential part of Islam according to Abduh  ­ In the 1880s, Egypt had to borrow money extensively from Europe for cotton production so European  powers were able to control Egypt ­ The British were able to enter Alexandria in 1880 and they bombarded it ­ Abduh argued for various social and religious reforms, whereas Afghani always got himself involved  in political issues ­ Abduh was more interested in intellectual, religious, and educational reforms rather than political ones ­ Abduh was against taqlid and more towards ijtihad  ­ Abduh starts off by saying that Islam is not a closed – system and that there is potential for growth in  Islam ­ Abduh believes that God gives us general principles, but we derive our own rulings ­ Islam needs to be interpreted in its own day and time  ­ Abduh was also very keen on the educational system, he believed that it was too repetitive and there  needed to be a change ­ There were two types of schools in his time 1. Western model schools ­ Private schools 2. State schools  ­ Dogma schools ­ Abduh saw it as a problem because he thought the students were being alienated ­ He was critical of the traditional education because he thought it was irrelevant to reality (it was  narrative rather than critical)  ­ He argued for a new curriculum in Azhar  ­ Abduh focused on the fiqh rather than Shari’a  ­ Europe was governed by positive law Positive law = no law is perfect until it is working in the society, so it must be continually re­evaluated  2 Lecture 3 (Monday, June 25, 2012) – Wahhabism ­ The gates of ijtihad had been closed in the 11  century, which meant that the law couldn’t evolve  anymore (became an ideal rather than a reality)  ­ Abduh was also arguing for a positivist element in Islamic law  ­ He argued that God gave us general principles and that we as human beings need to derive our own  rule through them Maslaha = welfare of the community (Muslims)  ­ Meaning that God wants what is best for the community ­ Abduh argued that we could change many laws to maintain or create a law that is workable ­ There are two dimensions in Islamic laws 1. Humans and god Example  ▯prayers, fasting, etc. 2. Humans and humans  ­ Includes ijtihad  Example  ▯Abduh cit
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1 and half of page 2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit