Class Notes (836,321)
Canada (509,732)
Brock University (12,091)
Lecture 9

Lecture 9 (July 23).docx

7 Pages
57 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 3C03
Professor
Liyakat Takim
Semester
Spring

Description
Lecture 9 (Monday, July 23, 2012) – Muslims in North America or North American Muslims? Review  ­ Three characteristics 1. Divine appointment 2. Infallible 3. Extra knowledge ­ First imam was Ali, last imam was hiding Taqiyya = hiding your faith in order to save your life ­ Khomeini spoke out against the Shah in Iran  White revolution = importing western values (i.e. alcohol, pornography, etc.) ­ In 1963, Khomeini rose up in muharram (first month where Hussein was killed) and he was  imprisoned ­ The Shah got kicked out of Iran and ended up in Iraq ­ In 1971, the Shah commemorated a massive party  ­ The doctorate of wilayat al – Faqih was the authority of the ullamah and the jurists  ­ Khomeini was claiming that the ullamah did not have to wait for the messiah to exercise political  authority and that they have as much authority as the prophet ­ They had the ability to change the religion when necessary with regards to maslaha (what is good for  the community)  ­ There was a war between two countries, Iraq and Iran Islamic Fundamentalism  Fundamentalism = around the 1890s (Niagara Falls), a group of Christians came together to reassert the  fundamentals of Christian beliefs, they were reacting to certain events that they believed were  undermining Christian believes (i.e. Darwin and Biblical scholarship by German scholars, who  analyzed the Bible and pointed out mistakes)  ­ The Christian fundamentalists asserted that the Bible was the literal world of god ­ Another thing that was challenging them was the period of enlightenment that Europe was going  through  ­ When Galileo said the Earth was not flat, he was put on house arrest by the Church, the Church  finally admitted that the Earth revolved around the sun in the early 90s ­ Christian fundamentalists were reasserting Christian beliefs th ­ In the early 20  century, it was against the law to teach evolution theory in schools  1 Lecture 9 (Monday, July 23, 2012) – Muslims in North America or North American Muslims? Usul = the fundamentals of religion ­ In this sense, any religious person is a fundamentalist ­ Islamic fundamentalism is pure and simple and it is all about politics and power  ­ Due to the political vacuum, the fundamentalists try to assert political power and the ullmah have lost  credibility  ­ When we talk of Islamic fundamentalism we are talking of believers who want preserve identity and  values and they want to make religion as relevant today as it was in the past ­ They disagree with the secularization, they want to bring religion from the margin to the centre  (Islamic law/Shari’a)  ­ Islamic fundamentalism covers a wide range of groups ­ Sometimes there are more differences than there are similarities between these groups Example  ▯Hamas are very different from the Tabighis  ­ Tablighis are anarchists in India (born against Muslims) ­ They try to make Muslims better Muslims ­ They don’t believe much in technology  ­ They try to preach in mosques ­ They are completely apolitical  ­ Most of them take social services in the community ­ Some will fight against the west and some will fight against the government ­ Muslims turned to fundamentalism because they believed that socialism failed them and the west had  double – standards  ­ For many people the Islamic fundamentalist movements represent a better future than the corrupt  governments  ­ They want to make Islam more political and establish the Shari’a  ­ Their approach is very literalist  ­ For them, Muslims have decayed because they have left the true Islam  ­ These fundamentalists believe that they have the real idea of what is Islam ­ Not only are they the spokesperson of Islam, but they believe that they have the right to impose their  beliefs on others  ­ They also believe in the unity of Islam and that it should be a global umma ­ They believe in the reassertion of the political autonomy, which means fighting against super powers 2 Lecture 9 (Monday, July 23, 2012) – Muslims in North America or North American Muslims? ­ They participate in social services ­ Most of them live in countries that are politically oppressive and the only way they could channel  their frustration is through religion  ­ The political dissatisfaction is expressed through religion  ­ They believe that their social, religious, and political space is being violated by the government ­ They believe that the west is not only imposing western values, but they are also imposing  secularization on Islamic countries ­ They believe that the west is responsible for immoral values  ­ It is important to remember that fundamentalists are against their own leaders as much as they are  against foreign governments ­ They believe that they are involved in a jihad (struggle) against their government  ­ Al – Quieda’s message was to fight against any government who was against them, especially  Americans ­ They were also very against the Shi’as because they thought they were kafirs  ­ Many of them were inspired by Qutb’s movement ­ The Ikhwan now have political power in Egypt Hamas = formed in the 1980s, they wanted to recover the land that was captured by Israel ­ They wanted to do this in any way possible, including suicide bombing (not allowed in Islam) ­ They are now frustrated with Israel because it built a wall, which makes it harder for them to enter  Hizb al – Tahrir = means the party of freedom, it was set up in Jerusalem in 1952, their main goal is to  reestablish the caliphate  ­ They are very much apolitical  ­ They believe that any involvement in Canadian or American politics is sinful ­ They want a political Islam  ­ There are two kinds of obligations for fundamentalism 1. Individual ­ Prayers ­ Fasting 2. Communal  ­ Something that is obligatory for the entire community  3 Lecture 9 (Monday, July 23, 2012) – Muslims in North America or North American Muslims? Example  ▯a Muslim dies, it is not obligatory for every person to bury that person but it is communal  obligatory, if one person buries him then everyone else doesn’t have to do it  ­ If nobody buries him, the whole community is sinned  ­ In the fundamentalist view, it is a communal obligation to remove a leader that is corrupt and remove  Muslims in a foreign land  Example  ▯when Sadat signed the peace treaty with Israel, he became
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 3C03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit