Class Notes (837,434)
Canada (510,272)
Sociology (2,104)
SOCIOL 1A06 (735)
Lecture

Nov 22 26 Social strat .docx

5 Pages
75 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCIOL 1A06
Professor
Sandra Colavecchia
Semester
Fall

Description
November 22 , 2013 Becker • Becker points out those problems with sentence construction lead to unclear  writing. Along these lines he suggest we pay attention to syntax (the arrangement  of our words and phrases in a sentence). This means that we need to think through  the various elements of a particular sentence and the relations and order in which  we position sentence and the relations and order in which we position these  elements. This is important because:  *Syntax reflects logic and reasoning  • Becker recounts how he became a stronger writer. Becker:  *Learned to become a stronger writer by writing multiple drafts, sometimes over months  and years, and getting feedback from others on his work  *Became skilled at finding the One Right Way and editing by ear  • In Chapter 8 “Terrorized by the Literature” Becker suggests:  *It’s important to read the literature in your area because its unnecessary to try to  discover original ideas  Social Stratification and Global Inequality  Agree or Disagree? Inequality has always existed and will always exist. We will always have rich and poor  people in society and there is no escaping that fact. How can you use what you’ve learned  in the course thus far to evaluate this statement? ­Denies social structure  Meritocracy trumps inequality structures­ if you work hard enough and are determined  enough, you will succeed. –Conflict theory would say this is problematic Poor people are lazy and don’t want to work. What sociological insights can we use to  evaluate this statement? –People want to work but cannot; working poor (low paying  jobs) Money can’t buy happiness. How would a sociologist evaluate this statement? Lower  income = lower life expectancy  Social stratification: patterns of social inequality that exist because of how wealth,  power and prestige are distributed among society and passed down intergenerational.  Ehrenreich (2001) • Studied the working poor in American society  • Went undercover – participant observation – fake resume – survive low paying  job with minimum wage (full time) • She was not able to pay rent/food  Structural Functionalism (Davis and Moore) • Social inequality is functional for society  • Inequality in education is declining – poorer people are now given the opportunity  if they apply themselves  • The most important positions in society must be the most highly paid  • Agree or disagree?  • Example: Doctors – people wouldn’t be motivated to go through medical school if  there wasn’t a financial reward  Critique of Davis and Moore  Of the following jobs, I would personally rank ___ as being the most important:  Farmer, Doctor, Artist, Caregiver of children, Political Leader  • How can we use these results to critique Davis and Moore?  Donald Trump = considerable inherited wealth  How can this help us to critique Davis and Moore’s theory?  Can you think of any examples of individuals who have done enormously important work  for little or no financial reward? Why did they do this work? How does this help us to  critique Davis and Moore’s assertion that inequality is the result of providing financial  rewards for the most important positions in society?  Conflict Theory Perspective  • Inequality is created and maintained by one group in order to protect and enhance  its own economic interests  • Worker working at minimum wage – creates profit for business in your one hour  of work – don’t get to see that profit because worker does not own means of  production  • Marc: “class consciousness” – owners try to exploit workers – greater inequality  with industrialization – interests of other workers are the same of yours – working  class can over throw capitalism  • Criticisms – overcome disadvantage backgrounds – ignoring other kinds of  inequalities  Symbolic Interactionism  • People create inequality in their everyday interactions  • Social class status – on how we interact with one another – physical position  yourself in the conversation  • High with low status – more entitled to feel closer to t
More Less

Related notes for SOCIOL 1A06

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit