Class Notes (838,001)
Canada (510,615)
Sociology (2,104)
Lecture

INTIMATE RELATIONS PART 2 MATING JAN 22.docx

7 Pages
142 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCIOL 2Q06
Professor
Dr.Lina Samuel
Semester
Fall

Description
SOC 2Q06 INTIMATE RELATIONS PART II THEORIZING MATING AND MATE SELECTION JANUARY 22 Key Terms: • Bride Wealth: money or goods which a groom must pay to bride’s family • Dowry: money or goods that the bride’s family pays to grooms family – Samuel, Lina. 2007. Women, work and fishing: an examination of the  lives of fisherwomen in Kerala, India. South Asia Research 27 (2): 205­ 227.  o With the rise of individualism, enlightenment – see young people marry  people they want to marry – choosing the types of relationships they want to  be in o The end of both WWs made a huge difference o Mating came out from being parental control o Contemporary moment – love is a prerequisite for a mating relationship o As people go up the social hierarchy – more stricter parents o Caste system – parents more particular as you go up the classes more money  at stake o Bride wealth: money goods that the groom has to pay the bride’s father o Dowry – brides family pays the groom’s family o As individualism emerged – system of dowry tended to collapse o Marrying for love – no longer necessary o In indian society practice of dowry still continues at inflated rates o Her research: as fishing became more industrialized, mechanized – became a  space where more money was flowing o Women then incorporated into these factories – more money o Then we find that despite the earnings they were making – this didn’t  challenge or diminish the dowries they had to pay – instead lead to inflated  dowrys – parents expected to pay very large dowries o Within the older generation – fishing communities didn’t have a practice of  dowry – reserved for upper caste o However with more money flowing –sanscritization of the practices from the  upper class o Fishing families practiced dowries to show own status o Parents increasingly getting into debt to fund their daughter’s marriages o Important to recognize – its collapsed in some –places but it continues despite  this being illegal in india o Became institutionalized after 1  WW o Certain expectations for dating – revolutionary moment – replaced rules that  parents had o Dating – has been seperated from marriage  o Purpose of dating has become recreational and sexualized o Strong assumption that mating and partnering has to do with some social  exchange o Education, money, occupational status, influence – these are concrete  resources that are brought into the relationship o Social exchange theory: o People initially attracted to people based on similarities o Cost benefit analysis  o Acceptance, approval, support, intimacy – all these perks of being with  someone atttractive, wealthy etc.  o Costs: the effort put into these  Research in Mate Selection • Goodwin (1990) – Ranking of qualities in  potential mates • Townsend and Levy (1990) – Female respondents trade off physical attractiveness  • Hatfield and Sprecher (1995) – Men rate physical attractiveness higher than women o homogamy: marrying someone in similar educational or social background o Endogamy: marrying in your own spaces o Greater your option at finding the right person – greater the chance of you leaving  the relationship and moving on o If there isnt an abundance of wealthy, attractive individuals out there – more  likely to overlook your partner’s flaws o Exposed to maximum eligible partners in university o Males: listed friendship, personality, attractiveness etc. – women had similar  qualities o Townsend and levy study: o Female students tend to consider men that were less attractive as potential  partners providing they have higher social status (if well educated etc.) o Men are less likely to accept someone that is less attractive with higher social  standing •   “…men continue to stipulate that potential partners be physically attractive, thin,  and sexy—a finding consistent across racial and class lines—women’s ads  frequently emphasize the desire for a partner who is “secure,” “professional,”  “successful,”, and “ambitious””  • (Jagger, 2001: Koziel and Pawloski, 2003; Phua, 2002, referenced in Nelson,  2010: 277). o Analysis of looking at personal ads online and newspapers o Necessary to look sexy, nice body, attractive etc. o This is common among all cultures  o Women’s advertisements: seeking men who are secure, professional etc. o Men place greater focus on physical qualities o Women care more about social status Jesse Bernard (1982) nd • The Future of Marriage 2  Edition – Marriage gradient: mating of attractive young women with older, more  prospersous men – Marriage as a common means of upward social mobility – Who is left out? o Marriage gradient: take qualities and rank them from low to high o Both men and women rank themselves and others on this gradient o Commonly observed: mating of attractive young women with older more  successful men o Reinforces power of groom’s family (hypergamy) o Most women regardless of how educated expect husbands to be superior in  income, wealth, education, intelligence etc. o Less than 10% of women in study expected to exceed their partner on any of these  levels o If possibility of seperation increases if man’s relative earnings decline o Hypogamy: choosing partner of lower background o 2 groups of people left out: older powerful women, and less powerful men o These women experience higher rates of divorce especially if they marry the men  in this lower category o We tend to select mates based on their general resemblence o Similar in age, proximity, attractiveness, education etc. • Hypergamy: choosing a higher­ranking partner • Hypogamy: choosing lower­ranking partner Theories of Mate Selection A) Psychodynamic Theories – Parent Image Theory – Ideal Mate Theory Parent image theory: - Emphasis on childhood experiences, family backgrounds on choice of mate - Comes from oedipus complex - Man is likely to marry someone who resembles his mother - Woman is likely to marry someone like her father - There is a resemblence between a woman and mother in law and man in father in  law - We may not realize these qualities yet we do it subconsciously Ideal mate theory - When you are a child you have fantasies about what your partner is going to be  like - These experiences become a model - Problems occur if we still hold these childhood images of what our partner should  be like – put pressures on partners for how our relationship should be like B) Needs Theories – Complementary Needs Theory (Winch, 1958) – Instrumental Needs Theory (Centers, 1975) Complementary needs theory - How needs influence needs in our partners - People tend to selct mates whose needs are opposite but complementary to our  own - Nurturant people – want to take care of people – common marriage between  sibling of 3 and oldest – marries someone that is a younger sibling - This person has grown to be a nurturant individual – likely to marry a sucurant –  person who is dependent - Another case is the dominant and submissive individuals Instrumental needs theory - Sexism  - Women fulfill identity by finding a man with stronger sexual drives than their  own - Dominant male, submissive female - Couplels happiest when mutual needs are fulfilled Theories Continued • C) Exchange Theories:  – Exchange theory (cost­benefit analysis) – Equity Theory (fairness a key principle) Exhange theories: - Seek relationships where they can max
More Less

Related notes for SOCIOL 2Q06

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit