Class Notes (835,094)
Canada (508,924)
Sociology (2,104)
SOCIOL 2S06 (332)
David Young (323)
Lecture

Lecture 24 & 25 - January 6th & 8th.docx

5 Pages
71 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCIOL 2S06
Professor
David Young
Semester
Fall

Description
Evaluation of Early Neo­Marxism A) Strengths of Gramsci and the Frankfurt School 1. Cultural Analysis • Saw the importance of analysing culture and ideology in capitalist society • Members of Frankfurt school addressed culture and ideology through the culture  industry • Gramsci addressed culture and ideology through hegemony  • The subjective, cultural and ideological superstructure 2. Dialectical Analysis • Response to economic determinism and the critical theory of the Frankfurt school  drew the importance of dialectical analysis • Looking at the conflicts and contradictions between different elements in  capitalist society and out of these conflicts and contradictions that something new  will emerge • Gramsci talked about how there is a dominant group and a series of subordinate  groups and he emphasized the conflict between the groups • Ideological struggle/war of position to see who’s ideology is going to dominate in  society • The members of the Frankfurt school ­ The ideas associated with the  enlightenment came into conflict with the ideas and rationality of capitalist  society 3. Contemporary Applications • In relation to Gramsci we talked about how contemporary neo Marxist are using  his notions about hegemony to understand what’s going on in our capitalist  society B) Weaknesses of Gramsci and the Frankfurt School 1. Economic Analysis 2. Extreme Pessimism • Only applies to the Frankfurt school • Members of the Frankfurt school didn’t see potential for change because we are  so manipulated by the culture industry that a revolution to overcome capitalist  society is unlikely • Gramsci talked about the possibility of a war of position so he saw the potential  for change to occur – subordinate groups can win the ideological struggle and  change the ideas of society so we can over through capitalism Conflict, power and later neo­Marxism Introductory issues and historical overview A) The inaccessibility of early neo­Marxism theory • Largely inaccessible for English scholars  • Gramsci wrote his notebooks in the late 1920s and early 1930s but Selections from the  Prison notebooks was not published until the early 1970s • Horkheimer and the Adorno wrote the Dialectic of Enlightenment in the 1940s, but the  book was not published in English until the early 1970s B) The critique of structural functionalist theory • Ralg Dahrendorf critiqued the focus on social order in structural functionalism and its  lack of attention to social conflict • C. Wright Mills critiqued the abstract nature of structural functionalism and its lack of  attention to power C) Developments involving later Neo­Marxian theory 1. Growth in the 1960s • The ideas of Dahrendorf and Mills helped to pave the way to the growth of  acceptance of Neo­Marxian theory • Main reason is that society was changing and structural functionalism could not  address the changes in society that were happening  • Structural functionalism had a hard time addressing the various social importance  that grew in the 1960s • Sociologists realized we should take another look at Marx since structural  functionalism cannot address these issues 2. Debate in the 1990s • Concerns the continuing relevance of neo­Marxian theory • Emerged in the 1990s for a particular reason because in the late 1980s we saw the  collapse of the soviet union • On the one hand, right­wing academics argued that neo­Marian theory must be  abandoned – they contended that the end of the Soviet Union proved that the Marxian  project was now dead – Marxism was now theory without practice • On the other hand, left­wing academics argued that neo­Marxian theory is still  relevant – they contended that neo­Marxian theory remains crucial for understanding  A biographical sketch of Ralf Dahrendorf A) Early life • 1929 born in Germany • Participated in anti­Nazi political activities B) University education • 1947 started an undergraduate degree at the university of Hamburg  • 1953 – started working on a PhD in sociology at the London school of economics C) Marriage and Family • 1954 – married a woman who had been a fellow student at the London school of  economics • Went on to have three daughters but marriage ended in divorce • After that he remarried and married another academic but that also ended in divorce • Third wife was a medical doctor D) University and political career  • 1956 – completed a PhD and started a university career was professor of sociology at  several different universities in Germany • 1959 – published Class and Class conflict in industrial society • 1968 – started a political career serving as a member of parliament in Germany  • 1974 – became the director of London school of economics E) Time in both Germany and Britain • 1974 – started dividing time between Germany and Britain • 1988 – became a British citizen F) Later life and death • 1997 – began retirement • After retiring he moved between Germany and Britain  • 2009 – died in Germany at the age of 80  The theoretical ideas of Ralf Dahrendorf   A) Situating Dahrendorf’s theoretical ideas • Trying to develop an alternative to structural functionalist theory • Conflict theory expressed in his influential book – class and class conflict in industrial  society • 1) Reaction to structural functionalism o Structural functionalism was the dominant theory o It was also a theory that focussed on social order o Social order was the key issue in structural functionalism o Dahrendorf thought that a focus on social order is useful o But he argued that the problem with structural functionalism that since it places  so much emphasis on social order it isn’t addressing the realities of social  conflict o By focusing on social order it was missing the reality on
More Less

Related notes for SOCIOL 2S06

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit