Class Notes (839,221)
Canada (511,223)
Sociology (2,104)
Rhona Shaw (23)
Lecture 7

SOCIOL 3G03 Lecture 7 - February 4th.docx

4 Pages
163 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCIOL 3G03
Professor
Rhona Shaw

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 7 – February 4h • Health Care Crisis in Canada o Medicare remains our best loved social program  We regard it as a basic human right o For many it is a defining feature of Canada and of being Canadian  It represents a commitment to shared responsibility  Is a cultural recognition that we all are vulnerable o Since 1990s, much rhetoric about how the Canadian health care system is in crisis  Is too expensive  The system can no longer sustain itself  There is an need for new solutions  Particularly privatization o Will also address deficiencies and redundancies within the existing system  Will give us more choices o Will give us the much need health care we currently are not receiving o This situation will only get worse because of our aging population  Old people are going to be a $$ drain on the system  • Health Care Crisis in Canada – Alberta o Province of Alberta at the forefront on expanding the role of private for profit health care  across Canada  A few other provinces have been quick to follow – Quebec and British Columbia  Alberta has long­term plans for expanding for profit health care • In terms of delivery (surgeries and hospitals) and funding (insurance) o Alberta has been incrementally dismantling the public health care system in that province o March 2000 – Bill 11 The health care Protection Act (HCPA)  Introduced by Alberta’s conservative government  Bill greatly expanded the number of treatments and services that PFP surgeries  and diagnostic clinics could offer and charge to Medicare  o However, Bill 11 met with huge public outcry  Threat that privatization would pose to the public system and to the principle of  universality o One Canada wide study did  find that many Canadians were concerned with certain  specialist wait­times   However, also found that if individuals are willing to pay for these non­insured  procedures, many of these same specialists seemed to be readily available to do  them o This stiffened public opposition to Premier Klein’s privatization agenda o Undaunted by negative public reaction, Alberta’s government insisted  Introduced protections within the HCPA that would:  Limit the range of services offered by private surgeries and diagnostic  imaging clinics  And that would prevent them from becoming hospitals  o With these modifications, the bill passes  Once the doors were opened to private for profit provides, Alberta’s government  has shifted to the question of who pays  Government looking to eliminate those protections that were included under Bill  11 o Bill 11 an important step toward privatized health care in Canada o In 4­3 decision, Supreme court of Canada, ruled that  Quebec’s ban on private health insurance for services covered by the provincial  health plan violated Section 1 of Quebec’s charter of human rights and freedoms  The right to person “inviolability” (to be secure from being infringed) • Health Care Crisis in Canada – Quebec o The media claims that this is Medicare’s final below o The case we brought forward by  Jacques Chaoulli, a doctor with a private practice in a wealthy Montreal suburb –  against the public system and increasing the privatization of health care o Both men were backed by private clinic owners from across Canada  o Klein declares his support for the Chaoulli decision  States this decision will allow Canadians more choice and timely access to the  health care services they want and need o Within weeks Klein’s government issues a request for proposals from insurance  companies:  The costs of developing a parallel private health insurance system  Successful bidder was a US based insurer – Aon Corp o Were awa
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit