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SOCPSY 1Z03 (462)
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Lecture 1

SOCPSY 1Z03 Lecture 1: Lecture1&2

7 Pages
91 Views
Fall 2016

Department
Social Psychology
Course Code
SOCPSY 1Z03
Professor
Paul Glavin
Lecture
1

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SOCPSY 1Z03
Wednesday September 7th, 2016
Course Syllabus:
https://avenue.cllmcmaster.ca/d2l/le/content/189992/viewContent/1531337/View
Two lectures a week* One tutorial a week*
Tutorials BEGIN week 3***
Books:
-DeLamater textbook 8th edition $120.00
(e-reader version)
NO ICLICKER
USE TURNITIN
Grades:
Midterm Exam (Multiple choice) 25%
Assignment 25% Pages should e uered ad hae  to
.5 argis all tet should e doule spaed  poit fot
Tutorial Attendance 10%
Final Exam 40%
Email Guidelines:
Malanie Dani: ([email protected])
Include course code
(READ SYLLABUS BEFORE SENDING EMAIL)
“tart a eail ith professors ae ad sig off ith  ae
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Lecture
Formal Definition of Social Psychology:
The ssteati stud of the ature ad auses of hua soial ehaior Delaater
Stanley Milgram:
Good and evil acts reside in the individual (psychological condition or ingrained in our genes)
“tale Milgras obedience to authority experiments
Particularly interested in world war 2
Electric shock experiment
More questions they get wrong the higher the shocks the person gets; it was an experiment on
the person giving the shocks
More tha half of people adiistered the shok that ould hae killed that soeoe
People listen to authority**
Key Ideas:
Social psychologists are skeptical of personal experiences as mean to understanding
human social behavior
-they rely instead on systematic observation
Recogizig the poer of situatio i hua social behavior
TOPICS THAT SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGISTS ARE INTERESTED:
-socialization and the social origins of the self
-the social basis to perception and cognition
-social influence and persuasion
-conformity in groups
-what causes aggressive versus altruistic behavior?
-social roles and individual behavior
FOUR CORE CONCERNS:
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find more resources at oneclass.com

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Description
find more resources at oneclass.com SOCPSY 1Z03 Wednesday September 7 , 2016 Course Syllabus: https://avenue.cllmcmaster.ca/d2l/le/content/189992/viewContent/1531337/View Two lectures a week* One tutorial a week* Tutorials BEGIN week 3*** Books: -DeLamater textbook 8 edition $120.00 (e-reader version) NO ICLICKER USE TURNITIN Grades: Midterm Exam (Multiple choice) 25% Assignment 25% Pages should ▯e ▯u▯▯ered a▯d ha▯e ▯▯ to ▯.▯5▯ ▯argi▯s all te▯t should ▯e dou▯le spa▯ed ▯▯ poi▯t fo▯t Tutorial Attendance 10% Final Exam 40% Email Guidelines: Malanie Dani: ([email protected]) Include course code (READ SYLLABUS BEFORE SENDING EMAIL) “tart a▯ e▯ail ▯ith professor▯s ▯a▯e a▯d sig▯ off ▯ith ▯▯ ▯a▯e find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com Lecture Formal Definition of Social Psychology: ▯The s▯ste▯ati▯ stud▯ of the ▯ature a▯d ▯auses of hu▯a▯ so▯ial ▯eha▯ior▯ ▯Dela▯ater▯ Stanley Milgram: Good and evil acts reside in the individual (psychological condition or ingrained in our genes) “ta▯le▯ Milgra▯▯s obedience to authority experiments Particularly interested in world war 2 Electric shock experiment More questions they get wrong the higher the shocks the person gets; it was an experiment on the person giving the shocks More tha▯ half of people ad▯i▯istered the sho▯k that ▯▯ould ha▯e killed that so▯eo▯e▯ People listen to authority** Key Ideas: Social psychologists are skeptical of personal experiences as mean to understanding human social behavior -they rely instead on systematic observation Recog▯izi▯g the ▯po▯er of situatio▯▯ i▯ hu▯a▯ social behavior TOPICS THAT SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGISTS ARE INTERESTED: -socialization and the social origins of the self -the social basis to perception and cognition -social influence and persuasion -conformity in groups -what causes aggressive versus altruistic behavior? -social roles and individual behavior FOUR CORE CONCERNS: find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY AND OTHER FIELDS What is Sociology: Sociology is the scientific study of the development, structure, and functioning of human society -Sociological Social Psychologists are interesting the relationship between individual and groups and broader social structures What is Psychology: Psychology is the scientific study of the individual and of individual behavior -Psychological Social Psychologists are concerned with individual behavior and social stimuli What is Social Psychology: Social psychologists examine human behavior and the social world by following a scientific method -They make systematic observations of behavior and formulate theories that are subject to testing Social Psychology as a Sciences: A systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. The Scientific Method VS. -Personal experiences -Commonsensical knowledge -Philosophy What is a Theory? - ▯A set of i▯terrelated propositio▯s that orga▯izes a▯d e▯plai▯s o▯ser▯ed phe▯o▯e▯a.▯ Delamater & Myers - It goes beyond mere observable facts by postulating causal relations among variables - If a theory is valid, it enables its user to explain the phenomena under consideration and make predictions about events not yet observed Quiz Question: Which of the following is an example of scientific theory? a All swans are white b Political systems with the death penalty are evil c Fascist political systems will eventually fail because they are evil d All of the above e None of the above It is only a theory if it is testable and have some sort of explanation find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com Theoretical Perspectives: - General explanations for a wide array of social behaviors in a variety of situations - Provide a frame of reference for interpreting and comparing a wide range of social situations and behaviors Social Psychology investigated the five following theoretical perspectives: 1. Role Theory 2. Reinforcement Theory 3. Cognitive Theory 4. Symbolic Interaction Theory 5. Evolution Theory Role Theory: Much of observable social behavior is people carrying their role, similar to actors preforming on stage According to role theory, to cha▯ge a perso▯▯s behavior, it is necessary to change or redefine Propositions in role theory: People spend much of their lives participating in groups and organizations  Within these groups, people occupy distinct positions  Each of these positions entails a role, which is a SET OF FUNCT
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