Class Notes (835,674)
Canada (509,327)
Lecture 2

lecture 2.docx

6 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Women’s Studies
Course
WOMENST 2AA3
Professor
Chikako Nagayama
Semester
Winter

Description
Feminist theory as a ‘tool’ “The master’s tools never dismantle the master’s house.” – Audre Lorde “Every tool is a weapon, if you hold it right.” – Ani DiFranco Central questions for Lecture 2 What is critical thinking? Feminist standpoint theory, emerged from Second Wave feminism, is a mode of critical thinking.  What did they say about the dominant mode of critical thinking? Which premises in feminist standpoint theory have been challenged? Also, requirements for Analytical Response will be discussed. Progress of thought (or not?) Richard Giblett ­ Mycelium Rhizome (2008) Modernism is characterized by movement from one point to another Analytical thinking Analyzing: Breaking material into constituent parts, determining how the parts relate to one another  and to an overall structure or purpose through differentiating, organizing, and attributing. (Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Objectives, Revised by Lorin Anderson, 2001) http://cll.mcmaster.ca/resources/B/blooms_taxonomy.html What is critical thinking? A definition of critical thinking: metacognition; thinking about one's own thinking. “Metacognition is being aware of one's thinking as one performs specific tasks and then using this  awareness to control what one is doing" (Jones & Ratcliff, 1993, p.10). Jones, E.A., & Ratcliff, G. (1993). Critical thinking skills for college students. University Park, PA:  National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment. Critical thinking in Feminism for Everybody On the contrary, are there cases in which one is not aware of own thoughts? Free­floating intellectuals Karl Mannheim (1893­1947) Ideologie und Utopie (1929) Sociology of knowledge Asserted that material conditions (i.e. class structure) underpin one’s thoughts by expanding the  idea of Marx and Engels. ‘Free­floating intellectuals’ academics don’t belong to working or economic class?  1926 United Kingdom General Strike In­class journal questions: Academia as a social institution (1) What material (social, cultural, political) environment is typically an intellectual’s work located  within? (2) What happens to feminism when it becomes part of the institution of academia (hooks Chapter  2)? Rene Magritte “The Castle of the Pyrenees” (1959) Feminist standpoint theory Critical thinking is gendered. Nancy Hartsock Dorothy E. Smith Both critiqued Marxist analysis of material conditions Feminist scholars in the 1980s: Hilary Rose, Iris Young, Mary O’Brien, Alison Jaggar, Jane Flax Race and gender: Patricia Hill Collins’s critique on feminist theorization of motherhood Feminist standpoint theory (cont.) They argued that “feminist standpoint is rooted in a ‘reality’ that is the opposite of the abstract  conceptual world inhabited by men, particularly the men of the ruling class, and that in this reality  lies the truth of the human condition.” (Heckman 1997, 348) Women’s difference from men rooted in social relations (i.e. Dual­systems theory) Feminist standpoint as a more truthful, ‘real’ account of social reality than men’s Challenged by postmodern feminists (re: truth claim) and Third Wave feminists (re: intersectionality) Gender analysis A main concern in the sociology of gender is how gender differences are produced. (vs. biological determinism) How to debunk biological determinism on sex? Classic Marxist view on gender difference Radical feminist theory postulates that male dominance in the private sphere is at the basis of the  inequality between women and men. “Personal is political.” Sexuality is primarily considered as a site of male dominance: DV, rape and pornography. (C. MacKinnon, A. Dworkin) Radical feminist view on gender difference Dual­systems theory The society is organized by the principle of capitalist patriarchy: the domestic space deals with the  reproduction of wage workers, which is a ‘shadow work’ that is made invisible from the market  economy (re: Heidi Hartmann, Roxana Ng) Reproduction Production Unpaid work as a foundational component of capitalism Capitalist system of paid work Gendered division of Labour N. Hartsock, “The Feminist Standpoint” (1983) “Women’s labor both for wages and even more in household production involves a unification of  mind and body for the purpose of transforming natural substances into socially defined goods. This  too is true of the labor of the male worker. There are, however, important differences.”
More Less

Related notes for WOMENST 2AA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit