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Lecture 4

ENGL 153 Lecture 4: September 18, 2017

by OneClass2373710 , Fall 2017
2 Pages
18 Views

Department
English
Course Code
ENGL 153
Professor
Lisa Grekul
Lecture
4

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September 18, 2017
Literary Theory: Feat. Jane Eyre
1. Pre-critical work
Reading
Who/What/Where
Laying the foundation
Plot
Geographical location
Themes
Why do these characters behave the way they do? (Motivation)
What does the text tell us about its time and place?
2. Historical-Biographical Approach
Looks for connection between the author and the text
OR looks for connection between time period and the text
History explains behaviour in text
Descriptive (not argumentative)
3. Psychoanalytical Approach
Freud: Motivation is driven by deep desires
How the characters think and what their motivations are
Impulses
Desires
Analyze deeper
Why?
Unconscious
Not always accurate
Generates argument
Mindful
4. Feminist/Gender Studies Approach
Marginalization of women
Men are “superior”
Patriarch = male
Maleness as a position of privilege and power
Highly politicized mode of interpretation
“Domestic space will be women's space”
Does Jane actually love Rochester? Or was she smart in thinking that she just needed the
man to get somewhere in life
5. Marxist Approach
Karl Marx
Father of socialism
Writer of the Communist Manifesto
First to invite individuals to think about socioeconomic inequalities and social classes and
how it effects us
Saw capitalist system as highly problematic and in need of dismantling
Jane wanted nothing more than to get out of her poor social class
All of her problems would be solved if she were only to have wealth
6. Postcolonial Approach
Postcolonial: Focusing on how colonialism and imperialism (hand in hand) are present in a
text and how they influence the narrative (characters, how they act, etc…)

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Description
September 18, 2017 Literary Theory: Feat. Jane Eyre 1. Pre-critical work Reading Who/What/Where Laying the foundation Plot Geographical location Themes Why do these characters behave the way they do? (Motivation) What does the text tell us about its time and place? 2. Historical-Biographical Approach Looks for connection between the author and the text OR looks for connection between time period and the text History explains behaviour in text Descriptive (not argumentative) 3. Psychoanalytical Approach Freud: Motivation is driven by deep desires How the characters think and what their motivations are Impulses Desires Analyze deeper Why? Unconscious Not always accurate Generates argument Mindful 4. Feminist/Gender Studies Approach Marginalization of women Men are superior Patriarch = male Maleness as a position of privilege and power Highly politicized mode of interpretation Domestic space will be women's space Does Jane actually love Rochester? Or was she smart in thinking that she just needed the man to get somewhere in life 5. Marxist Approach Karl Marx Father of socialism Writer of the Communist Manifesto First to invite individuals to think about socioeconomic inequalities and social classes and how it effects us Saw capitalist system as highly problematic and in need of dismantling Jane wanted nothing more than to get out of her poor social class All of her problems would be solved if she were only to have wealth 6. Postcolonial Approach Postcolonial: Focusing on how colonialism and imperialism (hand in hand) are present in a text and how they influence the narrative (characters, how they act, etc) Imperialism: One empires military taking over another over desire for resources or land (ex. Scramble for Africa) Colonialism: Colonize another part of the world, to settle, to spread colonizers language, culture, politics, religion (ex. Canada was a colony of England) Postcolonial is any time in history before colonization Ex. Bertha does not fit in to England because she is not prim and proper, however, she is super rich 7. The Lake/Boating Analogy Imagin
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