Class Notes (784,399)
Canada (481,118)
CLST 330 (15)
Lecture

CLST 330 – Feb13th.docx

6 Pages
33 Views
Unlock Document

School
Queen's University
Department
Classical Studies
Course
CLST 330
Professor
Fabio Colivicchi
Semester
Winter

Description
CLST 330 – Feb. 13th Symposia (cont’d): Art for symposion  Poetry: Many forms of early Greek poetry are related to the symposion Elegiac poetry for descriptive, normative, and hortatory discourse Military exhortation, for performance at the military symposion in Sparta and elsewhere  The collection of sympotic poetry ascribed to Theognis of Megara and the values of the aristocratic  elite The poetry of Alcaeus and the political hetaireia  The poetry of Solon and others on wider political themes Lyric poetry, designed to be sung by solo performers to the lyre, on more personal themes Many of the poetic forms reflect the context of the symposium ­ especially the catena in which each  couplet or stanza sets a theme to be taken up by the next singer in the group  th Until the mid 6  century BC, symp otic poetry is produced primarily by the participants Afterwards, professional poets play a significant role Vase Painting: Images for symposion: Images on vases participate in the rituals of the symposion  They suggest themes for discussion and poetry Show models of praise and blame Play games and make jokes for the amusement of drinkers  At least in the period of great flourishing of the aristocratic symposion, the artists who painted those  images were an active part of the sympotic arena, almost like the poets E.g. Corinthian crater with the myth of Eurytios Eurytios king of Oichalia and his sons at symposion while Hercules is still eating  Francois Crater – 570 BC Depicts over 200 figures, many with identifying inscriptions and represents many mythological  themes  Artemis Ajax carrying body of Achilles Hunting of Calydonion boar Chariot races at funerary games for Patroklos Wedding of Peleus and Thetis Procession: Chariot of Zeus Dionysus Achilles ambushing Troilos  Frieze with animals Battle of pigmies and cranes Dance of the Athenians boys and girls at Delos After Theseus rescued them from the Minotaur Centauromachy Return of Hephaistos to the Olympus Themes on symposium vases: Until the late 6  century BC: great mythical subjects – especially from epic poems C. 530­470 BC, rising number of scenes with human protagonists involved in all activities of the  symposium, among with the so­called Anacreontic vases (depicting men in oriental costume) E.g. Smikros self portrait as participant From 470 BC there is a slow decline of symposium scenes The Persian wars and the rise of radical democracy slowly make this practice less relevant and  accepted  Anacreon: “I do not like the man who, beside a full crater, sings of quarrels and fights and wars full of tears,  but the man who sings of cheerful joy enjoying the pleasant gifts of the Muses and Aphrodite.” Decline of the Symposium: The development of radical democracy and the decline of many aspects of aristocratic lifestyle after  the Persian wars cause a slow decline of symposion Especially of its most refined and elitist forms Together with lyric poetry  Aristocratic factions still kept the symposium alive for a long period, and the influence of the  th th Spartan model of conviviality also played a role in the late 5  and early 4  century BC A simpler form of symposion was adopted by middle classes, but its original function between  public and private declined together with the crisis of classical polis In Hellenistic age, true symposion is lost Another Arena for Citizens – The Athenian Justice System: No professionals: no judges, no lawyers, no police Very high level of individual participation, which resulted in widespread expertise in legal matters Quite common for Athenians to serve ad jurors and act as prosecutors and defendants The laws were discussed in the assembly, with large audience of citizens, and drafted by the  council of 500 – also open to all citizens above 30  Relied on high level of individual initiative Pseudo­Xenophon: “The Athenians handle more public and private lawsuits and judicial investigations than the whole  of the rest of mankind.” The Jury: 6000 voluntary jurors – nominated at the beginning of the year Randomly allotted to trials Juries usually ranged from 201­501, but could go up to thousands in cases of  major public interest The jury was supposed to represent the whole citizenry Participation in the juries, like attendance to the Assembly, was compensated with a
More Less

Related notes for CLST 330

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit