Class Notes (835,882)
Canada (509,468)
CLST 330 (15)
Lecture

CLST 330 – Feb25th.docx

7 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Classical Studies
Course
CLST 330
Professor
Fabio Colivicchi
Semester
Winter

Description
CLST 330 – Feb. 25th Greek Athletics: Kalokagathia – “being beautiful and good” The two concepts, physical and moral excellence, were strictly related and almost synonymous Places for physical training (gymnasia) were also places for education and culture Gymnasium from gymnos – “naked” Thucydides: The Spartans set an example by contending naked, publically stripping and anointing themselves  with oil in gymnastics exercises Formerly, even in the Olympic contests, the athletes who contented wore belts across their middles,  but that practice ceased To this day among some of the barbarians, especially in Asia, when prizes for boxing and wrestling  are offered, belts are worn by the combatants Plato: Not long since Greeks thought it disgraceful and ridiculous (as most barbarians do now) for men to  be seen naked Xenophon: Believing that contempt for the enemy would kindle the fighting spirit, he gave instructions to his  heralds that the barbarians captured in raids should be exposed for sale naked So when his soldiers saw them white because they never stripped, and fat and lazy through  constant riding in carriages, they believed that the war would be exactly like fighting with women  The origins of Greek athletics: Bronze age contests Early athletic games: Homer, Iliad 23 – funerary games for Patroklos Homer. Odyssey 8 – contests among the Phaecians  Frescos with bull leaping, boxers, etc.  Modern approaches: It is the consequence of the Greek “natural antagonistic attitude” Is it an instinctive need It is a by­product of work It is a ritual practice, especially tied to funerary cults It is a “ritual sacrifice of energy” It is an introduction to war The culture of competition: Competition is fierce and victory is highly priced, but it is controlled and not destructive, and its  actual result is cohesion From the vey beginning, athletic competition in Greece is an inclusive and social practice – involves  mediation and respect of shared rules  In fact, athletics is one of the “middle grounds” of Greek society, where mediation between its  components happens The basic features of Greek athletics:  Highly organized and institutionalized from the beginning of Greek culture Fundamental cultural and identity role A means of settling contrasts and meeting the need to stand out and prevail of individuals, social  groups, poleis A balance between this need and the basic principles of community and equality Greek society did not have a “centre” and was based on the balance of contrasting forces The gods of the gymnasium: Hercules – strength and physical training Hermes – logos, intellectual training Eros – philia, love, and solidarity  Agon – competition  Training and professionalism: Complex training and dietary programs for athletes Contests were numerous and activity could be almost uninterrupted Equestrian contests were accessible to the elite only  The other contests, in theory, were open to all, but not many could train intensively and full­time There are mentions, perhaps not very reliable, of great athletes of humble origins, but they were  probably exceptions – at least in archaic age Took enormous amount of discipline to win at Olympia – regulated eating, restrictions, no cold  water, handing self over to coach, etc.  Not only glory – prizes given to winners as well List of victories and prizes of the wrestler Theaios of Argos and his family, as reported by Pindar: Panhellenic victories at Nemea, Isthmia, and a hoped­for one at Olympia Bronze shield at the argive Heraia Oil­filled amphorae of Athens Silver wine bowls of Sicyon Woolen clothes from Pellene in Achaia Bronze prizes from Kleitor, Tegea, and the sanctuary of Zeus on Mt. Lykaios Other benefits: Exceptional status among citizens Gifts from the city and other citizens, later also sums of money
More Less

Related notes for CLST 330

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit