Class Notes (836,053)
Canada (509,597)
CLST 330 (15)
Lecture

CLST 330 – Feb4th.docx

7 Pages
41 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Classical Studies
Course
CLST 330
Professor
Fabio Colivicchi
Semester
Winter

Description
CLST 330 – Feb. 4th Greek Warfare Con’t: The Other Warriors – horsemen, light infantry, archers, slingers, mercenaries: According to a recent trend of research, these “irregular” warriors played an important role already  in the archaic age, but hoplite ideology downplayed or totally denied their presence The “war of hoplites” described in ancient sources would be a relatively recent construction, an  idealized representation of a “gentleman’s warfare” of old  The formation of the “hoplite myth” would date to the period after the Persian wars to stress the  opposition between Greek and barbarian military ethics, and especially to support the claim of the  upper class to the leading role in politics, which was threatened by the rise of the lower classes  who did not serve as hoplites  The presence of light infantry and other mobile troops is not explicitly recorded before the 5   th century BC However, the phalanx is very exposed to the attack of lighter troops Since it is not likely that archaic armies were made of hoplites only, we may assume that they were  accompanied by some non­hoplite troops However, it is a fact that when non­hoplite soldiers were in demand, they were usually supplied by  areas of the Greek world where polis institutions were little developed, or by foreign countries It seems that fully developed Greek poleis did not produce many of such warriors  Cavalry: Was absent in most of the Greek archaic poleis Exceptions were the few regions of the Greek world where large plains could be used for horse  breeding Thessaly and Boeotia – Thessaly was the area of Greece where horsemanship was the most  developed Macedonia also had a tradition of horsemanship The king and the aristocracy traditionally fought on horseback E.g. Macedonian coin of king Alexander I E.g. Bronze statue of Alexander the Great  Long and specific training was necessary th th Only between the 5  and 4  century BC did it become a regular component of the armies ­  especially for patrol, screen, pursuit of light infantry, and attack of disorganized enemies The Athenian cavalry is represented on the Parthenon frieze – Athenians organized a large cavalry  in the mid 5  century BC Horses had brandmarks on their flanks Peltasts: Type of light infantry Often served as skirmishers Carried a crescent­shaped light shield called a pelte Used javelins and swords Originally form Thrace, but this type of soldier became common in Greece especially in the  4   th century BC Archers and Slingers: In the archaic age, Scythian archers were used for their superior skill and better bows In the Greek world, archers and slingers were usually from peripheral areas where such weapons  were used by shepherds for hunting and defense  E.g. Crete, Akarnania, Malis, Elis, Rhodes The Evolution of Greek Warfare from the 5  Century: The Phalanx: In general, the hoplite phalanx was still the main combat unit, but there were changes in military  gear Classical hoplites had lighter helmets and armour – made phalanx more mobile and flexible Equipment also less expensive this way and more people could afford it Armies could be more numerous and more people could reach the prestigious hoplite status and  the relative political role Starting from the Peloponnesian war, there were attempts to improve the traditional use of the  phalanx with a different battle order and basic maneuvers Hoplite with linothorax (linen cuirass) Cuirass is piece of armour which covers front of torso Stele from Thespiae – hoplite with pileos helmet: The Corinthian helmet went out of use around 450 BC and was replaced by lighter and more open  types, especially the pileos type  The Battle of Delium (424 BC) and the first documented use of tactical warfare in Greece Traditional hoplite tactics – elite troops and commander on the right wing to counter the natural  tendency to shift to the right The Battle of Leuctra (371 BC) Theban tactics – the bulk of the army with the elite “sacred band” and the commander on the left  wing to meet the best enemy troops and their general The rest of the troops avoid contact with the enemy  The Total War: Long, permanent, and waged by all means Campaigns in distant regions for ambitious plans of conquest and destruction of the enemy  Battles more complex and armies more numerous Generals use strategy, fast moving, deception, intelligence  The army is required to execute orders and maneuver More complex structure of command starts to develop Large use of non­hoplite forces Light infantry, artillery, specialized corps, cavalry  The Decadence of the Citizen/Hoplite: Phalanx is not the absolute protagonist of warfare anymore – other corps are as important or  sometimes more important The new tactics require long and specialized training Militiamen cannot be as effective as professionals, even if there are attempts to improve their  training and create semi­professional elite units However, Greek poleis never considered dissolving the citizen army Increasing role played by mercenaries Mercenaries: Some specialized mercenaries (archers, peltasts, etc.) were probably already in use during the  archais period In late 5  century BC, mercenary hoplites were also hired in poor regions of Greece (e.g. Arcadia) Greek merthnariesthre well known in the archaic age in Asia and Europe In later 5  and 4  century BC, the economic crisis made a number of Greek mercenaries available  for Greek and especially non­Greek employers E.g. Persian satraps and Cyrus the Younger  Mercenaries were appreciated for their effectiveness and were considered more expendable than  citizens  However, they never totally replaced militia Typical army of tyrants instead When they became impossible to ignore, mercenaries were represented in literature in a very  negative way Aristotle considered them inferior to citizens in courage Aristotle: “Again, experience of some particular form of danger is taken for a sort of Courage;…This type of  bravery is displayed in various circumstances, and particularly in war by professional soldiers. For  war (as the saying is) is full of false alarms, a fact which these men have had most opportunity of  observing; thus they appear courageous owing to others’ ignorance of the true situation. Also  experience renders them the most efficient in inflicting loss on the enemy without sustaining it  themselves, as they are skilled in the use of arms, ad equipped with the best ones both for
More Less

Related notes for CLST 330

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit