Class Notes (835,428)
Canada (509,186)
CLST 330 (15)
Lecture

CLST 330 – Jan 16th.docx

9 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Classical Studies
Course
CLST 330
Professor
Fabio Colivicchi
Semester
Winter

Description
CLST 330 – Jan 16th Classical Religion: Role of religion in the public life of Democratic Athens No such thing as democratic religion, some effects of democracy on religion 2 men who in 6th century killed one of the tyrants, the brother of the actual tyrant of Athens and  later consider the founding fathers of heir democracy by the Athenians Kritios and Nesiotes Given a couple of status in the Athenian agorà inspiring monument Their image was important to an Athenian, saw these status everyday Many different kinds of hero Honoured with a cult and could still doing something for the living They were not gods but they were something in between Attic vases with the tyrant slayers: 2 status impressed in the visual culture of the Athenians Liked to use status as a model for art and production of everyday pottery One has a sword and one has something else Relief on a law against tyranny 337/336 BC: Democracy and other concepts important to democracy like demos (the people, the whole city) Late 4th century stone Have democracy crowning demos A great city festival: the Athenian Panathenaia: Intensification of political life meant also an intensification of religious life Do this by public festivals (increase participation in public life increase participation in religious life) All Athenians are supposed to participate, more inclusive than the assembly, some limitations  (couldn’t go if you were too young, a women or didn’t have full rights) Festivals were more inclusive (women were allowed to go) Even people who were not full right citizens could participate This festival was a great city festival It was the festival of Athena Celebrated every year but there are the greater festival every 4th year (much more upscale and  grand festival) Celebrated what they thought was the birthday of Athena (28th day of July­month which took its  name after the festival­month of the sacrifice of the 100 cults) Greater festivals established in 566 BC and lasted until the end of antiquity when the emperor was  Christian and forbade it Citizens had to participate by group, more of less like political life with a number of roles given to  select citizens (appointment of people similar to appointment of city officials) Festival organized by a committee of 10 (one from each of the ten tribes) They are chosen by lot and are members of the boule (city council) Appoint these 10 men the same way as the appoint magistrates People also appointed by boule in charge of sacrifices Women in charge of weaving the robe given to Athena (peplos) at the end of the procession 4 which were little girls (between 7 and 10, selected on basis of birth by priestess of Athena), were  kind of representation of the women of Athens They set up the loom 9 months in advance Grown women actually wove Still follow a custom which is older than democracy where the tribes were 4 Ergastinai were the people who actually did the work Chosen by birth, this must be a ritual or custom older and incorporated into democratic festival Athletic and music contests, etc. elder citizens could not participate actively in these contests, they  had representative role, they participated in a procession bearing branches (olive tree branches) Not all of them were bearers of branches Metics even participated (non­Athenian residences) by bearing trays of silver or bronze full of  offerings (plentiness)­good wish for the year to come, beautiful to see and meant good year for  agriculture was about to come Freedman and non­Greeks participated “Barbarians” could participate Allies also sent representation (sent gifts, cows for the sacrifice and armour) A number of positions for women, priestess of Athena (women was the most important figure) The Processional route of the Panathenaia: Whole city was involved Festival was a display of Athenian participation in democracy Parade following Panathenaic way Started from the double gate of the city walls (dipylon gate), Pompeion is where there were  buildings and offerings for the festival and priests were there, they walked through the potters  quarter and then to the agora the public square (large enough for them to perform all contests­later  it was just for selected group of events) and then went up to the acropolis where the sacrifice of 100  cows on the great altar; offering of the robe to the statue of Athena Polias (meat was shared among  the participants­not a part of the usual diet of the everyday Athenian) Contests and Prizes: Inscription early 4th century BC Dance in which dancers are in armour (pyrrhic dance) Tribal contest in manly excellence (men were judged on how handsome they were) Valued how beautiful and fit your body is, seen as strictly related to your moral virtues Models of perfect citizens, model for all Athenians Torch night race, rely race, pass the torch to other runners Boat races in the Pyrrhus harbour Singers and musicians get the most money, cultural event Panathenaic Amphora: If you won you got money and a gold crown and oil Oil is very powerful and something athletes use Oil with the olives of the sacred olive tree of Athena at the Akropolis In special vase as Athena fighting on it with inscription (prize for victory in the contest of Athena) On the other side there are representations of the contests and the amphora in between the  contests Nike (victory) giving the amphora to a charioteer who has just won Giving a winner a prize­amphora If you were a winner in Athens and went back home outside of Athens you were considered  amazing Rhapsode: Contest for someone who gave readings of the epic poems Footraces Wrestlers: Body of wrestlers is different from body of the runners Referees have sticks, more effective than a whistle Pankration: Form of wrestling similar to mixed marshal arts Child races: Charioteer: One of the most important competitions (pride to winners) Great competition for wealthy people who did not have to compete themselves just pay for an entire  team Women could win because women could buy and own chariots Apobates child races First part of race done by child then a hoplite was on chariot and would jump off and continue  running, second part of race was a race of armoured men Aulos player: Armed dance Pyrrhic: Tribe competition Telemachos, Penelope and the loom Vertical loom with weights on the end Cult Practice: Greek festival Need public funding but it was worth it, it played important role in Athenian life Gree
More Less

Related notes for CLST 330

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit