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Department
English
Course
ENGL 100
Professor
David Murray
Semester
Fall

Description
SOCY▯122▯ ▯ Week▯one▯ Course▯Introduction;▯The▯Millennials▯ ▯ September▯10▯to▯14,▯2012▯ ▯ The▯re▯uired▯readings▯for▯this▯week▯are▯the▯“Introduction”▯(pp.▯xiii▯xxi)▯to▯The▯Promise▯of▯Sociology:▯The▯Classical▯ Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯Sociological▯Thinking;▯the▯“Introduction”▯(pp.▯xiv▯xvii)▯to▯The▯Concise▯Encyclopedia▯of▯ Sociology▯and▯the▯entries▯“Theory,”▯“Sociology,”▯and▯“Society,”▯(pp.▯646▯7,▯599▯600,▯592▯4).▯ Recommended▯ Reading:▯“Preface”▯in▯The▯Promise▯of▯Sociology:▯The▯Classical▯Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯ Sociological▯Thinking.▯ ▯ ▯ There▯are▯three▯overall▯objectives▯that▯this▯week’s▯readings▯are▯designed▯to▯achieve:▯ ▯ 1. to▯introduce▯students▯to▯the▯structure▯of▯SOCY▯122▯Introduction▯to▯Sociology;▯ ▯ 2. to▯indicate▯students’▯responsibilities▯for▯engaging▯with▯the▯material▯that▯will▯be▯presented▯in▯▯ ▯ SOCY▯122;▯ ▯ 3. to▯start▯students▯thinking▯about▯sociology▯as▯a▯discipline.▯ The▯specific▯learning▯objectives▯for▯the▯readings▯are:▯ ▯ to▯introduce▯students▯to▯some▯of▯the▯themes▯that▯will▯be▯covered▯in▯the▯first▯term▯of▯SOCY▯122;▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ to▯indicate▯students’▯responsibilities▯for▯engaging▯with▯the▯material▯that▯will▯be▯presented▯in▯▯ SOCY▯122;▯ ▯ ▯ to▯introduce▯students▯to▯some▯of▯the▯ways▯in▯which▯The▯Concise▯Encyclopedia▯can▯serve▯as▯an▯ ▯ important▯tool▯in▯their▯introduction▯to▯sociology▯as▯a▯discipline;▯ ▯ ▯ to▯draw▯students’▯attention▯to▯the▯overall▯goals▯and▯scope▯of▯the▯two▯main▯texts▯that▯will▯be▯used▯in▯ the▯first▯term;▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ to ▯provide▯an▯opportunity▯for▯students▯to▯draft▯a▯“road▯map”▯of▯the▯route▯and▯material▯they▯will▯ cover▯over▯the▯course▯of▯the▯first▯term;▯ ▯ ▯ to▯start▯students▯thinking▯about▯the▯field▯of▯sociology,▯the▯term▯“society,”▯and▯the▯idea▯of▯ ▯ sociological▯theory.▯ The▯reading▯for▯week▯one▯is▯ not▯heavy▯but▯it▯will▯serve▯as▯an▯important▯guideline▯for▯the▯remainder▯of▯the▯ course.▯As▯a▯result,▯take▯the▯time▯to▯do▯the▯readings▯thoroughly.▯▯ ▯ ▯ All▯students▯in▯SOCY▯122▯are▯advised▯that▯it▯is▯best▯to▯begin▯each▯week▯with▯the▯week’s▯ “r▯ading/activity/study▯guide.”▯The▯guide▯will▯let▯you▯know▯what▯material▯you▯should▯cover▯during▯the▯week,▯ what▯to▯focus▯on▯in▯particular,▯and▯it▯will▯serve▯as▯a▯one▯on▯one▯tutorial▯with▯Professor▯Beamish▯leading▯you▯ through▯the▯readings.▯Students▯in▯the▯intramural,▯lecture▯course▯will▯find▯that▯it▯is▯best▯to▯do▯the▯week’s▯ re▯dings▯before▯their▯lecture▯on▯Thursday▯or▯Friday▯while▯students▯in▯the▯correspondence▯course▯will▯find▯ that▯following▯the▯material▯in▯the▯reading/activity/study▯guide▯each▯week▯will▯ help▯keep▯them▯on▯track▯ th▯oughout▯the▯year.▯Before▯you▯start▯this▯week’s▯readings,▯be▯sure▯that▯you▯have▯read▯the▯material▯entitled▯ “Course▯Structure▯and▯Expectations”▯found▯inside▯the▯blue▯“Start▯Here”▯button▯on▯the▯course’s▯main▯Moodle▯ ▯ page.▯Once▯you▯have▯done▯that,▯you▯are▯ready▯to▯tackle▯this ▯week’s▯readings▯and▯activities.▯ For▯this▯week,▯you▯could▯break▯your▯reading▯up▯into▯three▯or▯four▯sessions:▯in▯the▯first▯session,▯read▯the▯ “I▯troduction”▯(pp.▯xiii▯xxi)▯and▯“Preface”▯(pp.▯ix▯xii),▯if▯you▯choose▯to▯read▯it,▯to▯The▯Promise▯of▯Sociology:▯The▯ Classical▯Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯Sociological▯Thinking.▯In▯the▯second▯session,▯you▯may▯read▯the▯ “Introduction”▯(pp.▯xiv▯xviii)▯to▯The▯Concise▯Encyclopedia.▯You▯might▯also▯want▯to▯scan▯Mike▯Ryan’s▯timeline▯ of▯events,▯figures,▯and▯publications▯that▯have▯influenced▯the▯development▯of▯sociology▯(pp.▯xx▯xxxvii)▯and▯ ▯ then▯look▯at▯the▯lexicon▯of▯the▯different ▯topic▯areas▯covered▯in▯the▯encyclopedia▯(pp.▯xxxviii▯lii).▯If▯there▯is▯a▯ topic▯area▯in▯which▯you▯are▯particularly▯interested,▯you▯could▯look▯up▯one▯or▯more▯of▯the▯entries▯listed.▯You▯ ▯ can▯also▯include▯the▯entry▯“sociology”▯in▯this▯session.▯In▯the▯third▯session,▯focus▯on▯the▯entries▯“society”▯and▯ “theory.”▯Finally,▯in▯a▯fourth▯work▯session,▯answer▯the▯different▯review▯questions▯at▯the▯end▯of▯this▯ reading/activity/study▯guide.▯ ▯ ▯ Reading/Working▯Session▯ 1 ▯ The▯Preface▯and▯Introduction▯to▯Sociology’s▯Promise:▯The▯Classical▯Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯ ▯ociological▯Thinking.▯ Begin▯with▯the▯“Preface,”▯if▯you▯choose▯to▯read▯it.▯The▯three▯basic▯principles▯that▯guide▯the▯structure▯ of▯this▯course▯and▯the▯text▯are▯worth▯noting▯–▯they▯provide▯some▯context▯for▯the▯“course▯map”▯that▯ you▯can▯draw▯once▯you▯have▯read▯the▯“Introduction.”▯ The▯“Introduction”▯sets▯out▯the▯four▯main▯objectives▯behind▯the▯course▯text▯(see▯pp.▯xiv▯xviii)▯as▯well▯ as▯an▯overview▯of▯the▯text▯itself▯(pp.▯xviii▯xxi).▯The▯introduction▯orients▯you▯to▯what▯the▯fall▯term▯will▯ involve▯–▯you▯can▯also▯read▯the▯conclusion▯to▯The▯Promise▯(pp.▯283▯7)▯and▯see▯some▯of▯the▯same▯ themes▯re▯stated▯in▯a▯different▯manner▯there.▯▯ The▯advantage▯of▯reading▯the▯introduction▯to▯any▯book▯is▯that▯it▯will▯almost▯always▯set▯out▯a▯“road▯ map”▯of▯what▯the▯author▯intends▯to▯cover▯and▯its▯order▯–▯it▯provides▯you▯with▯a▯sense▯of▯what▯you▯ can▯expect▯over▯the▯course▯of▯the▯book.▯Typically▯conclusions▯recap▯the▯main▯themes▯and▯ arguments▯of▯a▯book;▯reading▯the▯introduction▯and▯conclusion▯of▯a▯book▯is▯a▯very▯useful▯way▯or▯ orienting▯oneself▯to▯the▯arguments▯that▯one▯will▯encounter▯in▯the▯bulk▯of▯any▯book.▯ With▯respect▯to▯this▯introduction,▯read▯through▯it▯“to▯see▯what’s▯there;”▯don’t▯study▯it▯in▯detail,▯ don’t▯try▯to▯commit▯any▯of▯it▯to▯memory.▯You▯can,▯however,▯make▯marks▯in▯the▯margin▯to▯highlight▯ specific▯points▯such▯as▯each▯of▯the▯four▯main▯objectives▯behind▯the▯book.▯Take▯some▯note▯of▯the▯ overview▯of▯the▯text▯but▯don’t▯make▯any▯detailed▯notes▯yet.▯ When▯you▯have▯read▯through▯the▯introduction,▯go▯back▯and▯start▯to▯draft▯a▯“road▯map”▯of▯the▯text▯ (and▯first▯term▯of▯the▯course).▯Write▯a▯sentence▯or▯statement▯for▯each▯of▯the▯four▯main▯objectives.▯ Then▯note▯in▯a▯few▯points,▯the▯material▯you▯can▯expect▯to▯cover▯in▯each▯of▯the▯text’s▯eight▯chapters▯ that▯make▯up▯the▯body▯of▯the▯text.▯See▯if▯you▯can▯identify▯the▯developmental▯ thread▯that▯runs▯ through▯the▯book▯–▯the▯book▯builds▯in▯each▯chapter▯on▯the▯basis▯of▯material▯covered▯in▯earlier▯ chapters.▯What▯are▯the▯main▯themes▯that▯will▯be▯covered▯in▯the▯first▯term?▯What▯chapters▯group▯ together?▯Is▯there▯a▯connection▯between▯the▯different▯groups?▯You▯do▯not▯need▯to▯write▯out▯ answers▯to▯those▯questions▯but▯they▯are▯worth▯reflecting▯on▯for▯a▯few▯minutes▯because▯they▯will▯ show▯you▯the▯outline▯of▯the▯path▯forward▯that▯you▯will▯follow▯over▯the▯12▯weeks▯of▯the▯first▯term.▯ Keep▯this▯map▯–▯you▯can▯refer▯back▯to▯it▯ as▯you▯begin▯each▯chapter▯to▯know,▯beforehand,▯how▯the▯ material▯in▯each▯chapter▯fits▯into▯the▯overall▯plan▯of▯the▯text▯and▯course.▯The▯map▯can▯also▯serve▯as▯ a▯useful▯reference▯for▯studying▯later.▯Finally,▯at▯the▯end▯of▯the▯term▯you▯can▯look▯back▯on▯this▯road▯ map ▯and▯a▯similar▯one▯for▯the▯second▯term▯to▯see,▯in▯outline,▯the▯material▯you▯have▯considered▯over▯ the▯course▯of▯this▯particular▯introduction▯to▯sociology.▯ ▯ Reading/Working▯Session▯ 2 ▯ ▯ The▯Introduction▯to▯The▯Concise▯Encyclopedia▯and▯the▯entry▯“Theory.”▯ ▯ The▯“Introduction”▯(pp.▯xiv▯xviii)▯to▯The▯Concise▯Encyclopedia▯is▯not▯long▯and▯you▯are▯not▯going▯to▯ memorize▯any▯of▯it.▯Like▯all▯introductions,▯this▯one▯orients▯the▯reader▯to▯the▯contents▯that▯follow▯ although▯in▯this▯case▯it▯is▯an▯encyclopedia▯–▯a▯compendium▯of▯entries▯related▯to▯specific▯individuals,▯ concepts,▯time▯periods,▯or▯events▯that▯are▯of▯importance▯to▯sociology▯–▯rather▯than▯an▯argument▯ that▯develops▯over▯the▯course▯of ▯the▯book.▯▯ George▯Ritzer▯and▯Michael▯Ryan▯make▯the▯important▯point▯(see▯the▯section▯“Using▯The▯Concise▯ Encyclopedia▯of▯Sociology”)▯that▯this▯particular▯encyclopedia▯provides▯you▯with▯a▯unique▯ opportunity▯to▯explore▯the▯most▯significant▯aspects▯of▯sociology▯from▯a▯number▯of▯different▯ perspectives,▯following▯one▯or▯more▯of▯the▯strategies▯that▯they▯indicate.▯In▯many▯ways,▯The▯Concise▯ Encyclopedia▯can▯serve▯as▯a▯“parallel▯introduction”▯to▯sociology▯that▯fully▯complements▯the▯course’s▯ other▯two▯core▯texts▯–▯The▯Promise▯of▯Sociology:▯The▯Classical▯Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯ Sociological▯Thinking▯and▯The▯Classical▯Tradition▯and▯Contemporary▯Society.▯ After▯you▯have▯read▯through▯the▯introduction,▯come▯back▯and▯answer▯these▯two▯questions:▯ 1. What▯is▯the▯provisional▯definition▯of▯“sociology”▯that▯Ritzer▯and▯Ryan▯suggest▯(see▯p.▯xvi)?▯ ▯ ▯ 2. At▯the▯end▯of▯that▯section,▯just▯prior▯to▯the▯section▯on▯how▯to▯use▯the▯encyclopedia,▯Ritzer▯and▯ Ryan▯note▯that:▯“Sociology▯is▯attuned▯to▯such▯extreme▯micro▯(individual)▯and▯macro▯(global)▯ relationships▯and▯everything▯in▯between”▯(p.▯xvi).▯Write▯out▯the▯definition▯that▯follows▯that▯ statement.▯Remember▯that▯you▯have▯done▯this▯because▯we▯will▯return▯to▯it▯in▯a▯couple▯of▯ weeks.▯ ▯ ▯ Ritzer▯and▯Ryan▯suggest▯that▯one▯way▯to▯use▯the▯encyclopedia▯is▯to▯turn▯to▯the▯lexicon▯and▯then▯look▯ at▯“key▯concepts,”▯“key▯figures,”▯“theory”▯and▯“methods”▯(p.▯xvii).▯This▯is▯a▯good▯suggestion.▯In▯the▯ space▯below,▯identify▯two▯or▯three▯key▯concepts▯that▯you▯think▯are▯important▯to▯you▯and▯you’d▯like▯ to▯know▯more▯about;▯indicate▯in▯a▯sentence▯or▯two▯what▯each▯concept▯means▯and▯why▯they▯are▯ significant.▯▯ 1.▯ 2.▯ 3.▯ Now▯think▯of▯two▯or▯three▯figures▯who▯you▯believe▯might▯be▯key▯to▯sociology▯–▯who▯would▯th
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