Class Notes (838,711)
Canada (511,059)
History (1,328)
HIST 122 (155)
Prof. (14)
Lecture 10

Hist122 – Lecture 10.docx

7 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 122
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Winter

Description
Hist122 – Lecture 10, Monday November 11, 2013 Forced Migration and the Atlantic Corder ­ Gets to level of understanding between inter­cultural relationship  Centralizing Japan at the eve of Tokugawa Shogun  ­ Centralizing of a few diyamos ­ Novel is at intersection between consolidation of a new state, THE state that  would rule Japan into modern period European Christians and Catholic Missionaries in Japan 1550­1613 ­ In 1542, the first Europeans from Portugal landed on Kyushu in Western Japan ­ They brought guns, trade, and Christianity ­ In 1550, Francis Xavier undertook a mission to the capital Kyoto ­ Franciscan missionaries followed Christianizing Japan From a letter of St. Francis Xavier (1506­52) to St. Ignatius de  Loyola in 1549  ­ Japan was isolated ­ Xavier was stationed in India, heard of Japan, inhabitants were untouched by  Muslims or Jews – they don’t yet see other religions in the rest of the world as  being challenges to Christianity ­ Place where the major conversion would take place ­ Good exchange network set up with Portuguese ­ Something you accepted by accepting the missionaries ­ When a ruler converted, he made everyone else convert ­ Neither state is stable ­ In this period you find one of these rulers, Diamyo of Sendai, 1567­1636 ­ Tokugawa rule – Edo  th ­ 16  century Europe, Catholicism is put on defensive because of reformation, you  see wars of religion in Europe, carried over/spilled over into Colonial world as  well ­ Catholic make alliance with Sendai diamyo Why did the Diamyo of Sendai delegation to Europe in 1613? ­ In 1597, Hideyoshi banned missionaries and executed 26 Franciscians in  Nagasaki ­ Why would the people consolidating the biggest diamyo in Japan want to get rid  of the Christians? ­ Allowed people who might hold out from Hideyoshi, centralizers did not want the  smaller diamyo to have access to another support ­ Precisely, because Christianity and conflict with Christianity went hand in hand,  they had to go  ­ Repression of Christians ­ In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu (was the founder) was victorious over most rivals  leaving the way open to centralization of power and becoming appointed shogun  in 1603 ­ Get rid of Christianity, it links you to foreign powers ­ In 1613, Ieysasu demanded all his diaymo and retainers forswear Christianity ­ By the time samurai come back the Tokugawa have taken control  ­ Is happening over a long period of time, many years Two Versions, Two Interpretations ­ Each side is justifying what they are doing, AMBIGUITY ­ Diamyo himself saying Great Ship left on September 15, named Hasekura  Rokuemon Tsunenaga and Imaizumi Saka, MAtsuki Shusaku, Nishi Kyusuke,  Tanka Taroemon – involved trade and politics ­ Spanish/Portuguese side: Luis Sotelo, dispatched as ambassador to preach  Christianity, brought them to see the Pope ­ 1613 – return trip takes 7 years, a lot of things happen in Japan in that time ­ Route:  o 1613: leave Japan o 1613­1614: Acapulco, New Spain – Mexico City – Puebla – Havana o 1614­1615: Spain and France – Madrid, Meet King Philip of Spain,  Baptism of samurai o 1615­16:  ­ Is in Japanese dress, meets Pope Paul and King of Spain, once he is converted he  changes his dress ­ Conversion in Spain in 1615, wearing European dress ­ Purely political and economic event, he never converted really By 1600s, Western European had a Global Distribution System BUT ­ One sided trade ­ Problem was that they came with European silver in their pockets and left it there,  didn’t get anything back  ­ Kicking out and killing of thousands of Christians are horrible tortures ­ Can’t have trade with Catholics without the Christians so they say forget it ­ Made arrangement with Dutch for them to trade ­ Dutch break into system, Protestant, fighting against Spanish so it was perfect,  confined them offshore to artificial island build, did not let them come into Japan  themselves, was mediated relationship ­ Very centralized How did European merchants resolve this great dilemma? ­ Back to the Atlantic: The Americas Solved Europe’s Asian Dilemma:  Colonialism= monopolies ­ Resolved it not in Asia,  ­ Colonialism extracted raw materials – not finished products ­ Created captive markets ­ Rid Europe ­ S excess population (refuges and dissidents) ­ Enslaved labor forced to produce the old world mass consumption crops: sugar,  cotton, coffee ­ Made it so America had to buy what Europeans made ­ Indentured servants were European, sometimes treated worse than people who  were actually enslaved, 10 year contracts, wanted to exploit them in that time ­ Old World Protestants ­ Created the Triangle Trade, wasn’t exactly a triangle but was somewhat like one ­ One colonial power, protestant power in the mix to its colonies in the Americas to  which the semi­finished raw goods would go from Americas to Britain  ­ Africans did not have a need for wool, needed cotton cloth, was actually Indian  cloth, another leg ­ Just when Japan is centralizing, adding guns to the mix, same coincidence, 1492,  demographic collapse, wholesale advantage by Europeans in the Americas,  allowed them to take control  Exploiting North America: First Nations, Settlers, the Enslaved and Global Consumers ­ Fur, Tobacco, Sugar ­ Package deal, each one had specific type of labor process ­ Fur was from first nations people ­ The very product determined the type of labor production ­ Why North American colonialism was different than Caribbean, or Latin America ­ Tobacco: labor connection as well, cropped by many European farmers, not  wealthy people at all  ­ Wherever sugar went, slavery went with it ­ Because of demanding labor regime, associated with growing sugar and  processing it ­ Very difficult, most people did not want to grow it in large amounts ­ Turn it into quasi­industrial operation, had to have people who couldn’t complain,  were forced to do it ­ Fur trade brought in competition, in our region ­ Brought in competition between French and Dutch and French and English ­ John Smith, mercenary in Ottoman Empire ­ First Nations were wedged between European powers, brought into rivalries  between competing European forces, divided them, armed them, escalation in  violence as people compete with each other ­ Diminishing amount of fur­bearing animals ­ Competition at a variety of levels, which leads to basically some consolidation  ­ By 1630, the Iroquois had muskets and created an effective political order ­ Movement of many first nations groups by competition  ­ Allying with European powers ­ Not enslaved, has profound impact on economic and political situation  th “Free” Land in the 13  Colonies: Free, Indentures, and Slave Labour ­ Produced: Barrels, Grains, Tobacco  ­ Consumed: European and Asian Imports ­ In general there are three forms of labor: free labor from First Nations that are  caught up in web of export/import rivalries, in secular coloni
More Less

Related notes for HIST 122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit