Health 101 Topic 7 External Ecology: Societal Factors Potentially Associated with Infectious Disease Risk (abstract) 1/ POPULATION GROWTH 2000: 6 billion people 2050: estimated 9 billion -increase in population could mean increase risk of infecti

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Published on 16 Oct 2011
School
Queen's University
Department
Health Studies
Course
HLTH 101
Professor
TOPIC 7. EXTERNAL ECOLOGY: SOCIETAL FACTORS POTENTIALLY
ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK
1/ POPULATION GROWTH
2000: 6 billion people
2050: estimated 9 billion
-increase in population could mean increase risk of infection
Trends:
i. Urbanization
-past 50 years, 25% of the population of rural has moved to urban.
-estimated by 2030, 75% of population in cities
-underdeveloped countries: reduced capacity for infrastructure
(sewage, trash, sanitation, health care)
-problems: increase in crowding reduces sanitation which increases
cohabitation with rodents which increases water, food, vector-borne
diseases (arthropods like ticks or fleas and bites from cohabited
animals
ii. Poverty
-decreased resources (sanitation, health)
-increased migration to cities (opportunities)
-increased pressure for sex trade workers (could be less likely to
care about own health)
iii. Migration
-approximately 30 million internally (inside country) displaced
people
-approx. 150 million displaced outside country
-results in spread of disease, increased crowding, low
infrastructure, bad living conditions
-which spreads microbes ie. malaria, Tuberculosis
2/ SOCIAL DESTABILIZATION
i. Warfare
-21st century: more likely to die in combat than from a disease.
-this was not common in previous wars
-also increases migration (crowding, reduces resources (ie.
sanitation and health)
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Document Summary

Increase in population could mean increase risk of infection. Past 50 years, 25% of the population of rural has moved to urban. Estimated by 2030, 75% of population in cities. Underdeveloped countries: reduced capacity for infrastructure (sewage, trash, sanitation, health care) Problems: increase in crowding reduces sanitation which increases cohabitation with rodents which increases water, food, vector-borne diseases (arthropods like ticks or fleas and bites from cohabited animals. Increased pressure for sex trade workers (could be less likely to care about own health: migration. Approximately 30 million internally (inside country) displaced people. Results in spread of disease, increased crowding, low infrastructure, bad living conditions. 21st century: more likely to die in combat than from a disease. Also increases migration (crowding, reduces resources (ie. sanitation and health) Increased transportation of vectors and reservoirs (ie. through deliveries) Ie. malaria: arrived in brazil (1937) from mail boat. Dengue fever (1 million infected, 20 000 deaths/year)

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