Class Notes (834,355)
Canada (508,511)
Philosophy (338)
PHIL 263 (8)
Lecture

Philosophy of Religion – Oct1st.docx

6 Pages
28 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 263
Professor
Jacqueline M Davies
Semester
Fall

Description
Philosophy of Religion – Oct. 1st Subtraction model of Christian secularism:  So much philosophy of religion is based on western assumptions – particularly secularism  Anglo­American or western European  ­ “The West” is not easily defined  Charles Taylor – ideas 7 part Canadian philosopher  Canada ­ proponent of multiculturalism  He is Catholic Uses his knowledge of what it is to have a religious commitment to his advantage in terms of  discussing multiculturalism  Questions assumption that secularism is neutral  Have remnants in religious history – dialectical move towards more civilized religion  If you think that religion is about superstition, then you can see why one religion is seen as more  civilized and progressive than another (E.g. Protestantism over Catholicism)   Also says that religious traditions assume much about communities  E.g. Buddhist majority countries do not impose vegetarianism even though they think all killing is  wrong  Barlas and Moghissi (this week’s readings): Barlas – feminist hermeneutics  View that religious people are just blindly obedient to religious texts is grossly oversimplified  Textual traditions are full of interpretation – this is unavoidable Can’t be avoided when it comes to making law – texts must be referenced and discussed  Different commentaries and views on the same texts  This is not unique to religious traditions – it is keystone to any legal matter  E.g. sacred text in Canadian law is constitution  Disputes goes to people who can interpret – supreme court  Compare and analyze to figure out the spirit of the constitution  American constitution – “All men are equal before god” What about women? This is disputed  Whatever the actual people who wrote the words meant is not as relevant – becomes a question of  what they should have meant Not subjective or black letter law  Interpretation is constantly contested  Sometimes taking things at face value brings about tons of contradictions  Women in Muslim majority countries or Muslim women in non Muslim countries are not just passive  victims  Have more or less power depending on where they are  There is enormous diversity of opinion amongst women – even those who have social power and  academic jobs with freedom of speech  Says that Islam is body of law and political theory that starts with the community  Would say that interpretation of the religious texts needs to happen in a way that takes women  seriously  Moghissi ­ Women’s agency  Wants to address issue of Islamic feminism in a way that suggests that: a) all women in Muslim majority countries are Muslim and  b) this is a secular matter Argues against a “Western” feminist tendency to want to celebrate Islamic feminism as a sign of the  political participation and freedom and quality of women in Muslim countries where there are  religious laws  Her targets are women who don’t know any better – we know next to nothing about being Muslim  and about what life is like in these countries  Muslim women have contested the assumptions of Western feminists about them  Some Western women want to “empower” others who don’t see it that way  Her model for agency is liberal individualist to some extent Reformed by Marxist thought  After revolution, one subgroup will take all the power even when revolution brought many groups  together initially  Change doesn’t always play out the way people plan  Iran – constant contesting of power  Dissent is not uniform  Moghissi says way forward is secularization  Says explicitly that this is not a Western thing – it is home grown  Exception is that Marxism comes from Western tradition  Religious thinkers often have different communitarian thoughts Matters of a feminist because of women’s relation to reproduction Likelihood of thinking about vulnerability comes into play  Has radically different views from Barlas Edward Said – Orientalism (1978) The flip side of the West Orientalism became a negative thing politically after Said He suggests that the construct of the West and East is Euro centric colonialism  Reflects political, economic, etc. projects of various European nations Construction of the East (whole of Asia) and the middle east as exotic and used as a foil against  the concept of the civilized west  He said that there was intellectual bankruptcy to a
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 263

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit