Class Notes (838,385)
Canada (510,871)
Sociology (1,100)
SOCY 227 (51)
Prof. (6)
Lecture 4

Lecture 4 socy 227.docx

20 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 227
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 4 : Socy 227 2014­01­28  Essay:  sources:  doesn’t matter how many you use   ­ try to make connections between macro level and how that affects the micro level ( personal individual life)  1 question: Giddens changes and show how it relates to uncertainity  sennett ­  having no control over life  2) changes of social class  chnges in race and ethnicity  Race, Ethnicity and Post­Colonialism  Outline: Preamble: identification, life­chances, representations    Introduction: challenges to Western social theory  What is Post­Colonialism? Contesting Colonialism  Cultural Imperialisms  Others and Subalterns  Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary Theory  Standpoint Epistemology Intersectionality  Intersectionality and Critical Theory Representation and Signifying Practices  Culture as a system of representation  Practices of Signification  Stereotyping  Conclusions     Identification, life­chances, representations Last Week: contemporary theories of class, cultural class analysis  Global Changes: new forms of global identification    Socioeconomic Changes: restructuring of economic and cultural positions Social Processes: how class is represented and understood  Personal Experience: how we are ‘classed’ by our everyday actions  This Week: how does the contemporary world continue to be shaped by dimensions of  race, ethnicity and western colonialism?   ­ domination over other countries gave power to  certain countries over others  Part One: What is Post­Colonialism? Postcolonialism is an effort to understand the effects of colonization and decolonization  on political systems, cultures, and individuals  Postcolonialism critically engages with the ‘universals’ that emerged from modern Europe: the citizen,  rational subject, Reason, individual equality  Such universals were used to legitimate and entrench colonial domination and systems of power But they are also the language in which ‘social justice’ is spoken    Thus these modern universals are both ‘indispensible’ and ‘inadequate’ How to seek ways of knowing that critique the dominant western ways of seeing? ­ colonalizism : works through taking away of certain beliefs and there is no vehicle for individualism   and there is a disconnect from one’s beliefs  ­   Contesting Colonialism Postcolonialism and ways of knowing ‘Historicism is what made modernity or capitalism look not simply global but rather as  something that became global over time, by originating in one place (Europe) and then  spreading outside of it’ (Chakrabarty 2000: 7) What is being contested? The universalizing tendencies of European thought  Ideas of progress, revolution, transformation, etc., hold the colonized in a state of ‘not yet’   Dominant discourse was how Enlightenment education was to enable the colonized to be capable  in the future  of acting as citizens   Tension between the universals of human rights and equality and the practice of subjugating the colonized  as ‘unfit’ to govern themselves   ­ instead of seeing Europe  as a dominant place, we see it as just another country ( provincialize it)  ­ idea of having to deconstruct and undermine  Colonialism and Scientific Rationality African and medieval Arab cultures of scientific knowledge‘written out’of  traditional accounts of the scientific revolution – Ancient Greece as the ‘cradle of civilization; the East as‘backward and‘Medieval’  Scientific knowledge used to‘show’the superiority of Europeans over other ‘races’; to classify and mark boundaries between them  Science can also police boundaries: the establishment and reinforcement of  boundaries between‘native’species and dangerous‘immigrants’; can include humans, non­human animals, food, and so on  Science and technology as  legitimations  of imperialism and colonialism:  first wave used religion, second wave used science and technology to ‘save’the‘dark continent; Africa needs‘saving’– G8 Summits  Post­Colonial Science: difficult relationships between former colonies  and colonizers in legitimating scientific knowledge – does scientific  knowledge still have to be‘judged’in the West?             ­ idea of science : rational , progress and value­ free  ­ still produces the dominant countries view on others  ­ scientific justification of essentializing difference    colonialism mark: 1)  sets of religious doctrines ( idea of saving)  2) scientific knowledge – position them as less than white people, in need of knowledge  Cultural Imperialism Postcolonialism and ‘ways of being’: a critique of ‘essentialism’  Eurocentrism and Colonization : ‘The idea of the West was central to the Enlightenment’ (Hall 1996: 187)   Identities are formed through (often binary) difference: West/East  Civilized/Uncivilized Democracy/Theocracy Developed/Developing Knowledge/Ignorance  Rational/Superstitious Just/Savage Industrious/Lazy Colonizer and Colonized : how the colonized can gain ‘recognition’ outside of the colonizer’s theoretical framework   ­ no vehicle for self understanding , anything we know about other cultures was written by someone who  doesn’t live there  VIDEO : ­ brings uo the idea of stereotyping of different cultures  ­ puts it as objective knowledge –  said ( the individual)   ­ ideological dominantion       Others and Subalterns Others and Othering Orientalism: representations of ‘the East’  ­ kind of like anti­semetisim  The East: ‘regressive, static, singular’ These ‘ideal Others’embodied  in everyday discourse, novels, art, science, and so on         ­ the power to be able to make knowledge about other people  Standpoint Epistemology Epistemology : study of knowledge, its conditions and justifications (how we know what we know)   Black feminist epistemology: knowledge is constructed in relation to everyday lived actuality, as opposed to  the positivistic tradition of western objective science What does it mean to have a standpoint ? Black feminist thought starts with the contradiction between:  Formal democratic promises of individual freedom and equality under the law and  ‘The reality [that]  differential group treatment based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship  status persists’  (Collins 2000: 23) ‘Subordinate groups have long had to use alternative ways to create independent self­ definitions and self­valuations and to rearticulate them through our own specialists. Like  other subordinate groups, African­American women not only have developed a  distinctive Black women’s standpoint, but have done so by using alternative ways of  producing and validating knowledge’ (Collins 2000: 252) Subjective lived experience, dialogue, emotion, responsibility   ­ people who are oppressed do not have the chance to speak or give their opinion  because their standpoint  is different than the dominant views   ­ intersectionality and lived experiences  : race – assume all white white people  live the same live with  privileges  Intersectionality How do the different dimensions of stratification relate to each other? Intersectionality is an ‘analysis claiming that systems of race, social class, sexuality,  ethnicity, nation, and age form mutually constructing features of social organizations,  which shape Black women’s experiences and, in turn are shaped by Black women’  (Collins 2000: 299) Matrix of Domination : ‘Particular arrangement of intersecting systems of oppression’ (race, class,  gender, sexuality, citizenship status, ethnicity, age)  Intersectionality creates different lived experiences and social realities: Structural : law, polity, religion, economy  Disciplinary : routinization, rationalization and surveillance Hegemonic : l
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 227

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit