Class Notes (836,273)
Canada (509,735)
Sociology (1,100)
SOCY 227 (51)
Prof. (6)
Lecture

Consumerism and Consumption feb 25.docx

23 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 227
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Winter

Description
Consumerism and Consumption 2014­02­25 Outline: Preamble: post­traditional society Introduction: has everything turned into shopping? Critical Theory: what happens to culture?      Consumption and Consumerism: triumph of consumer culture  Insatiable Consumerism: can we ever be satisfied?    Conclusions Post­Traditional Society Over the next few weeks: Consumption and Consumerism  Networks and Screens  Science and Nature  Risk and Expertise  Territories and Mobilities  Key dimensions of contemporary society at the present time Key issues for contemporary social theory   ­ they are what is going on now in the world  Has Everything Turned Into Shopping? Under Capitalism, for Marx, sensory life and desire are extravagantly inflated, in which  pleasure depends upon the continual accumulation of more and more things… Consumption today is perversely self­constituting and self­referential      After TV, shopping is the most popular ‘leisure pursuit’ across the world  More people define their lives in terms of what they acquire and own  The ‘freedom to consume’ has become central to how we ‘consume freedom’ Is this freedom? Are we satisfied? Do we feel more secure? Are we in control?  ­things in their own right : self­consituting  ( transformation of the self)  ­ we don’t shop for basic necessities  ­ people take time out of the day  to shop, it becomes a lifestyle  ­ people define themselves by what they have and not by who they are ­ people judge on the basis of what people have and who that makes them on the scale of hierarchy  ­ freedom to consume  becomes a freedom ­  able to consume health care and education – what kind of  freedom is that ? ­ are we satisfied ? Part One: Critical Theory What is Critical Theory? ­ the strand of theory  is critical of the social dominant order, sees ways out of the dominant ways of thinking  The Frankfurt School – leading German neo­Marxist intellectuals – reforming Marxism by incorporating  sociology, economics, politics and psychoanalysis to understand modernity  ­tries to understand what this does to people – psychologically  Contexts: Totalitarianism and bureaucracy  What has happened to the promises of enlightenment reason? Why no class consciousness and class revolution? ­ tries to understand society as a totality  ­ they see instead that everyone is controlled by beauracracy or fascisim  ­ how did we move from freedom to no freedom at all  Explorations of the ‘dark side’ of modernity:  How enlightenment ‘reason’ became ‘pathological’, denying freedom  How ‘instrumental reason’ dominates nature      Advanced capitalism and consumer society are ‘totally administered’  Society increasing has control over the personal domain Contemporary society is ‘one­dimensional’  ­ science in the enlightenment should lead to reason but seems to lead to dominantion ( warfare)  ­ reason becomes pathological not enlightening  ­ we use resources for ourselves , greed rather than what it is supposed to be used for ­ extract things from nature to use as a force of dominantion  PICTURE ON SLIDES:  why is mankind following one person if there was a period of enlightenment? ­ popular culture , movies, music – start to control the world, it dulls the senses and it prevents people to get  consciousness of where they are  because they are focused on the popular culture  Theodore Adorno on Popular Culture The ‘culture industry’ as an insidious form of totalitarianism (‘commercial brainwashing’) Culture Industry =  endless mass­produced copies of the same thing  The differences between the content of films, songs, radio, arsuperficial as they all become  commodities  Cultural products are standardized: this encourages conformity and we lack the ability to seriously engage with culture      Mass production of culture = pseudo­individuality and conformist behaviour Consumer culture = a culture of amusement, a distraction from suffering and resistance    Commodity Culture is  formulaic     The Culture Industry is an agency of anti­enlightenment …  ­Culture is turned into standardized form  that pushes a specific view onto the viewers  ­ pick a star, watch it , become washed over you  ­ told what to buy, who to be  ­ everything is the same – standardized versions of the exact of the same thing ( ex. All music sounds the  same)  ­ produces conformity because we all follow the same rules, someone does anything different and they are  seen as the other ( an outsider)  ­ people all look the same because they are told this is what to look like, constrained to look the same  ­ this idea of conformity  makes it so people cannot get out of it because they can not see that they are  stuck in it  PICTURE ON SLIDE:  ­ a bunch of houses that look exactly the same , picture of cubicals that look all the same  ­ forms of life are standardized and constrained  ­ we become a puppet in a process created outside of society  ­ we all tend to want to look the same  ­ levels of conformity are exactly the same  throughout the years Monopoly Capitalism: industry­culture­consumer   Mass cultural products ­ ‘all mass culture is identical’ Cultural products don’t have to pretend to be art any more They are defined as ‘business’ which in turn justifies the poor quality of their offerings in terms of market needs and economies of scale **POWERPOINTS SLIDES ­ the products we buy are not that greatly made  “ homogenous cultural product” – the plot , characters, actors : they are all generally the same  ­ “consumer needs” – screen endings to see what people will like  ­ economics and false consumer needs is what produces movies and products Art­ is important because it shocks  you and makes you think about something differently  ­ movies and media is not a thinking process, it encourages us to sit and watch   ­ art on the otherhand  challenges the mind and makes us think outside the consumerist form  \Art tends to express loss, with desire itself shown to be a mirage What’s wrong with  amusement ? Amusement ‘defends society’ – ‘To be pleased means to say Yes to the social order’ Amusement requires not seeing the ‘big picture’ (‘insulation from the totality of the social process’) Amusement means  not thinking deeply  about anything, especially about forms of suffering  (which  might make the audience say ‘no’) ‘…it is flight; not… from a wretched reality, but from the last remaining  thought of resistance’ ­ people think they are enjoying themselves when he thinks they are not  ­ people are put into a gloss in the sense when they are involved in the consumer state because they are  not critically thinking  Fake Individuality When we make distinctions between cultural products (e.g. Rhianna vs. Perry) these produce a pseudo­ individuality  The culture industry encourages ‘connoisseurs of small differences’ – cars, gadgets, films, music – to  perpetuate the illusion of competition    But, as soon as the film begins, we know how it will end…basic plot, characters, sequences, order is  interchangeable Are our desires and dating practices shaped by the ‘romantic scripts’ that circulate in the culture industry? ­ we think of ourselves as individuals but instead we are not , the media creates this sense of individuality  but instead it is fake  ­ there is a formulated  culture that we all buy into  Walter Benjamin on Art The mass production of art results in the loss of ‘aura’ (1936): An analysis of art in the age of mechanical reproduction must do justice to  these relationships, for they lead us to an all­important insight: for the first time in world history, mechanical reproduction emancipates the work of art from its parasitical dependence on ritual. To an ever greater degree the  work of art reproduced becomes the work of art designed for reproducibility   For Benjamin, the reproduction of cultural objects through mass media is  potentially  liberating rather than nullifying The collective and simultaneous viewing of art or film may actually  encourage reflection and critique  rather than eliminate it Mass production = potential democratization of art  But…advertising eventually subsumes the potential of photographic images  ­ ways in which capitalism is reproducing itself ­ people are distracted by this and we feed into the idea of consumerism – placed into a “fake world”  ­ same things are happening in art­ there are endless copies of everything ­ walter thinks the idea of art  is a good idea because the people who go to galleries get to embody the idea  of art and they get to perform this ritual  of art  ­ when it gets reproduced  , it helps more people see art and they can be enlightened by it  ­ mechanical reproduction – it can create more amounts of ritualized ways of looking at art  ­ potential domcratization of art:  he sees photographs  have been taken over by advertising  ­having photographs in your house , is not the same as going to a gallery and seeing it live  ­ photos have become mass produced art, it is become something to buy even if they are not good ­ paintings are used to advertise things ex. Mona lisa used in lego commerical Herbert Marcuse on Domination ‘Technological rationality’ increases in modernity: integration of people into capitalist consumer thought  necessary for smooth functioning of ‘one­dimensional society’ = conformity  Capitalist Consumer Culture creates ‘false needs’  ‘Most of the prevailing needs to relax, to have fun, to behave and consume in  accordance with the advertisements, to love and hate what others love and hate, belong  to this category of false needs.  Such needs have a societal content and function which  are determined by external powers over which the individual has no control…’  (1964: 391) Social reality forces people tdiscipline  their basic impulses (libido) ansublimate  the impulses into  acceptable activities (work, recreation, etc.) Capitalist culture allowpartial desublimation –  expression of our basic desires through consumption  of cultural products – promoting conventional behaviour that offers a partial and restrictive understanding of  human sexuality (using ‘sex’ to sell cars; desire becomes sold as exploitative pornography, etc.)   ­ increasing control of people over things  ­ there are ideas of false needs in which people believe they need these things but these needs have come  from elsewhere  ­ the need we feel to relax, or engage in recreation – false need, there is no need to do these things  ­ manufacturing false kinds of needs  ­ repressed of certain kinds of desires – freud  ­ repressed desires  are used to create a product – he believes this is standardized and its not you getting  anywhere, its you getting someone elses view  ­ created by a system of you wanting to purchase these things  ­ packaged vacation – the need to lie on the beach , packaged for you by people ­ produces “ happiness consciousness” : the fake belief that you are happy , and that you are genuinely  happy  but this is brought on by  consumerism  Work + Television = Stupefact
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 227

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit