Class Notes (836,148)
Canada (509,657)
Sociology (1,100)
SOCY 233 (6)
N/ A (6)
Lecture

SOCY235 – WEEK 7 Lecture Notes
Premium

4 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 233
Professor
N/ A
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCY235 – WEEK 7 Who Are Aboriginal Peoples?  A Brief History of Aboriginal Relations of Canada  • Not framing aboriginals as a problem to one of being a emergent political agency  – story of strength rather than one of poverty and disempowerment • Remarkable consolidation of political voices since 1970  1. Partnership & Cooperation (Contact ­1867) • 15,000­40,000 years prior to European contact  • tremendous diversity amongst aboriginal people , 50 languages  • Regarded as one group “Indian” language still survives in legislation –  Indian Act  • Commonalities – self sufficient, self governing, collective needs over  individual needs, collective identity, regulated by consensus, persuasion,  women and elders played a significant role, land was shared not privately  owned, native people did not see themselves as owning the land but  trustees for future generation, some groups were hierarchal • Confederacy came together for peace – diversity in economic systems 2. Assimilation (1876­1945)  • Revenue sources, federal government land transfers, royalties if on gas  and oil  • 61 treaties signed with the crown – land claim settlements, aboriginal  rights, use of resources, exemption of taxation, rights depend largely on  where you live • No reserve tax payed for on reserve goods  • Status Indian card which qualifies tax exemption, health benefits not on  reserves  3. Integration (1945 – Integration) • Recognized in 1982 constitution  4. Constitutional Autonomy (1973 – present) • Lost their identity if they wanted to attend post secondary schools etc  53% Status Indians, 11% non status Indians, 30% Metis, 4% Inuit  Metis: offspring and descendents of European­ Aboriginal unions, recognized in 1982  constitution; current struggle for official status, aboriginal title, aboriginal rights,  2003 Powley case set precedent  Inuit: never signed any treaties, negotiated several comprehensive land claims 1975­ 1999   Partnership and cooperation (contact to 1867): partnership of equals? Cooperation in  good faith? 1765 Royal Proclamation; early treaties  Assimilation (1876 – 1945): 1876 Indian Act defined Indian status; abolished political  sovereignty; restricted language and cultural practices; established residential schools   Integration (1945 – 1973): 60s sweep, 1969 White Paper   Conditional Autonomy (1973 – present): Calder Decision, 1973, Indian control of  Indian Education 1972, Constitution Act, Statement of Reconciliation, 1998, Apology,  Supreme Court Cases  Aboriginal peoples should not be molested or disturbed in the possession of suh parts  in our dominions and territories as, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us, are  reserved to them or any of them as their Hunting grounds.. but if they dispose of the  land , the same shall be purchased for Britain – 1982 Consitution  ­ Proclamation has been interpreted differently – British interpret it as they discovered  the land and therefore have sovereignty on it, having their monopoly over colonizing  the land   “The great aim of our legislation has been to do away with the tribal system and  assimilate the Indian people in all respects with the inhabitants of the Dominions  as speedily as they are fit for the change  “The indian Act aimed at assimilating Aboriginals into the new white majority,  and represented a colonialism, the exploitation, dominat
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 233

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit