Class Notes (837,175)
Canada (510,151)
Marketing (1,395)
MKT 300 (106)
Lecture

Chapter 14 notes .docx

6 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Marketing
Course
MKT 300
Professor
Shavin Malhotra
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 14, Aggregate demand and aggregate supply   3 key facts about economic fluctuation o Fact 1: Economic fluctuations are irregular and unpredictable   Fluctuations are often called the business cycle  o Fact 2: Most macroeconomic quantitates fluctuate together  Not necessary in quantity but will still show the trend. EG: real  GDP and investment/ spending  o Fact 3: As output falls, unemployment rises   When firms choose to produce a smaller quantity of goods&  services, they lay off workers, expanding the pool of  unemployment   Explaining short­run economic fluctuations o The assumption of classical economies   ‘Money is a veil”­ the first thing people notice is the nominal  variables, since everything is expressed as a $$price, but we should  look beneath the veil.  o The reality of short­run fluctuations   Must abandon classical dichotomy and neutrality of money o The model of aggregate demand and aggregate supply   Model of aggregate supply: The model that most economies use  to explain short­run fluctuations in economic activity around its  long­run trend  Aggregate­demand curve: A curve that shows the quantity of  goods& services that households, firms and the government want  to buy at each price level   Aggregate­supply curve: a curve that shows the quantity of  goods& services that firms choose to produce and sell at each price  level  The aggregate­demand curve  A decrease in the price level increases the quantity of goods& services demanded. Vice  versa o Why the aggregate demand curve slopes downwards  Y = C + I + G + NX  The price level & consumption: The wealth effect­ A decrease in  the price level makes consumers more wealthier, which in turn  encourages them to spend more. The increase in consumer  spending means a larger quantity of goods& services demanded.  Vice versa   The price level and investment: The interest rate effect­ A lower  price level reduces the interest rate, encourages greater sending on  investment goods, and thereby increases the quantity of goods&  services demanded. Vice versa  The price level and net exports: The real­ interest rate effect­ A fall  in the Canadian price level causes the real exchange rate to  depreciate, which stimulates Canadian net exports and thereby  increases the quantity of goods& services demanded. Vice versa o Why the aggregate­demand curve might shift  Shifts arise from changes in consumption  • EG: stock market boom. Crash  Preferences regarding consumption/ saving trade­off Tax hikes/ cuts   Shifts arising from changes in investment • EG: firms buy new computer, equipment, factories Expectations, optimism/ pessimism Interest rates, monetary policy Investment tax credit or other tax incentives   Shifts arising from government purchases­ • EG: Federal spending, EG: defense Provincial& municipal spending, EG: roads and schools  Shifts arising from net exports­  • EG: Booms/ recessions in countries that buy our exports Appreciation/ depreciation resulting from international  speculation in foreign exchange markets     The aggregate­supply curve  Long run= vertical Short run= upward sloping  o Why the aggregate supply curve is vertical in the long run  In the long run, the economies production of goods& services  (Real GDP) depends on its supplies of labor, capital and natural  resources and on the availability of technology used to turn these  factors into g& s’s.   Will be the same, regardless of what price level is  Classical dichotomy and monetary neutrality  o Why the long run aggregate­supply curve might shift  Natural rate of output: The production of goods& services that  an economy achieves in the long run when unemployment is at its  normal rate   Shifts arising from changes in labor (L)­ • EG: Immigration Baby­boomer retire Government policies reduce natural u­rate   Shifts arising from changes in capital (K or H)­ • EG: Investment from factories, equipment More people g
More Less

Related notes for MKT 300

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit