Class Notes (836,572)
Canada (509,855)
Psychology (1,975)
PSY 102 (450)
Lecture

PSY102 CH 1 LECTURE.docx

5 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 102
Professor
Colleen Carney
Semester
Fall

Description
September 6, 2012 Week 1 Lecture 1 Psychology HOW PSYCHOLOGY BECAME A SCIENCE What is Psychology ­we cannot accurately describe psychology because there are so many terms involved  with it ­critically examining the mind, brain, and behaviour ­spans many levels of explanation  ­biological to social influences. Why? ­gain new knowledge from each point of view ­attempts to answer many exceptionally difficult questions History of Psychology ­for centuries (1649­1879) ­psychology=philosophy ­merely thinking about the mind, brain and behaviour (experiences of what  he thought the mind was) ­1800’s ­American public was obsessed with paranormal ­psychology=spiritualism (“soul study”) ­psychologists=John Edward  ­no scientific evidence ­parapsychology remains a tiny branch ­spiritualistic claims are unfalsifiable ­they are currently untestable ­thus, cannot be proven to be false, but we cannot assume it’s true  ­they are also ­extraordinary claims ­unable to be replicated (we cannot measure spiritual experiences) ­have rival hypotheses (other explanations of  outcomes) ­Wilhelm Wundt – William James ­1879 – 1883 ­Germany – US (Harvard) ­first two official psych labs ­“mental events” could be quantified by introspection (personal experience of whatever  the mental event is) ­designed to emulate methods of traditional scientific disciplines ­began experimental methods  Structuralism: late 1800’s ­what are the basic elements of psychological experience? (some of the philosophical  questions that were being asked about the mind) ­generate a “map” of the conscious mind (introspection of sensations, images, feelings.  Where on my brain are sensations being experienced?) ­two major problems: findings lacked reliability (we use are whole brain to make  connections to our lives), imageless (automatic) thought (instantaneous knowledge and  recall) ­underscored importance of systematic observation  Functionalism: late 1800’s ­why is it adaptive? And how does the adaptation help us function? ­what is the benefit of keeping long term memories, but forgetting other memories ­how does shifting of the mind help us through our day? Behaviourism: early 1900’s (US) ­founded by John B Watson, and then BF Skinner ­it put introspection away, and wanted to focus on objective observable behaviour ­wanted to use and measure behaviours as proxies of learning (using rewards and  punishments) ­mind=black box, what goes “in” must come “out” ­how they are influencing behaviour and why it is influenced? ­don’t care what is in black box Cognitivism: mid 1900’s ­what is in the black box  ­interpretation of punishments and rewards  ­builds on behaviorist approach ­in order for a reward or punishment to work, it has to be specific to an individual Psychoanalysis: early 1900’s (Europe) ­internal psychological processes and unconscious thought ­how does our unconscious behaviour affect our everyday life ­how internal psychological states and sexual experiences early in childhood affect  people later on in life  ­problems? Unconscious mind is difficult to verify. Early processes are often biased.  Symbols are challenging to understand  ­symbols have to be interpreted by the individual experiencing the symbol ­current perspectives on five frameworks structuralism: mostly outdated ­current studies are not very clear cut functionalism: mostly absorbed in behaviourism and Cognitivism behaviourism: still unfluential Cognitivism: still very influential psychoanalysis: controversial Critical multiplism: take all the different methods and put them together and use all of  them at the same time  ­Basic psychologists are interested in finding research on their own, and applied they do  the research they apply it to the community (take it to a group that the knowledge directly  relates to) ­scientist­practitioner gap ­practitioner may not have all of the knowledge being researched by scientists ­scientists may not 
More Less

Related notes for PSY 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit