Class Notes (837,023)
Canada (510,053)
Psychology (1,975)
PSY 102 (450)
Lecture

PSY102 CH 2 LECTURE.docx

7 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 102
Professor
Colleen Carney
Semester
Fall

Description
September 13, 2012 Week 2 Lecture 2 Psychology PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS Research Methods Why do we need good research methods and research designs? ­reliance on “common sense” can lead to errors! (we may think things are  connected when they are really not) ­allows us to think critically about psychology! Historically, subjective impressions have led to tragic results 1890s  ­drilling a part of human/animals brains to see how to changing the  frontal/temporal lobe will change behaviour ­nothing was being measured, all subjective  ­1892l Gottleib Burkhardt, MD: Six people with schizophrenia  ­Egaz Moniz won a Nobel Prize in 1949 for his discovery of the therapeutic  value of lobotomy  ­thanks to the Nobel prize, operation rates increased ­Walter Freeman: Freeman­Watts Standard Procedure: ice pick, hammer,  local  anesthesia, a few minutes  ­between 1939­1951: 18 000 + frontal lobotomies done in USA ­10 years after: there emerged scientific, controlled, observable, measureable  evidence against the use of the frontal lobotomy! Heuristics ­intuitive judgments that guide thinking ­allow us to think quickly  ­use our past experiences to know how to act in the future ­mental short cuts ­we don’t have to be engaged in complex cognitive thought about absolutely everything ­helpful in conserving mental energy ­incomplete information ­complex problems ­experience­based ways to problem solve ­might be a reasonable solution, but….. the best one? ­we tend to over simplify reality (naïve realism) Representative Heuristics: Like goes with like ­the more similar two things are to one another, the more likely we will associate them  with one another ­the more different two things are, we will not associate them with one another ­when we judge the probability of something by its superficial similarity to a “prototype” ­example: stereotype/discrimination ­often, individuals commit base rate fallacies when judging the probability of an  outcome ­two little consideration of prior knowledge ­we don’t take all information into consideration  ­happens when we think about questions such as ­what is the probability that A belongs to B? ­what is the probability that A is an effect of B? ­what is the probability that A is the cause of B? ­people tend to answer these questions by assessing the degree to which A resembles B Availability Heuristics: Off the top of my head ­when we estimate the likelihood of an occurrence based upon how easily it comes to  mind  ­based on experience and imagination ­example: when there is a full moon, more babies are born ­not necessarily true Cognitive Biases ­often lead us to draw misleading conclusions Hindsight Bias ­tendency to overestimate how well we could have successfully forecast known outcomes ­“told you so” “hindsight is 20/20” “I knew it all along” Overconfidence Bias ­the tendency to overestimate our ability to make correct predictions Scientific Method ­eliminate (minimize) the influence of bias ­an approach used to find critical explanations for a larger number of finds in the natural  world ­allows us to generalize or know that the finding represents a large number  of people ­not merely an “educated guess” ­testing of research question/hypothesis: ­testable predictions, measureable, based on theory ­we can do this in a number of ways through many different types of research Types of Research Designs: Naturalistic Observation ­watching behaviour in real­world settings as it occurs ­high external validity: extent to which we can generalize our findings to  real  world settings ­can we say that the results are also true to people who were not involved in  the study ­low internal validity: extent to which we can draw cause and effect  inferences ­why/how do observations occur Case Study Designs ­examines one person, or a small number of people, in­depth, often over an extended  period of time PROS ­a lot of deep, rich, specific data ­document a new/rare/unusual phenomenon ­offers insights that can later be tested systematically CONS ­cannot determine a cause and effect relationship ­difficult to generalize results (they don’t represent an average person) Correlational Designs ­aims to specify the relationship between two variables (x and y) and able to predict one  from another ­basic elements of a correlation 1) Direction 2) Range (size) 30 Explained Variance ­scatter plots ­two dimensional graphs ­each dot represents a single person’s data ­basic elements of a correlation: direction ­if the correlation is positive, then: x increases, y increases OR x decreases, y  decreases ­if the correlation is negative, then: x increases, y decreases OR x decreases, y  increases ­says how they’re related  ­basic elements of a correlation: range (effect size) ­scores range from ­1 to +1 ­reflect how much things are associated ­farther away from zero, positive association, closer to zero, weaker  association ­basic elements of a correlation: explained variance  ­% of the true association is explained? (more intuitive than effect size) ­we calculate explained variance by  squaring the correlation statistic (and x  by 100): “R squared” ­how much of the association is explained Correlation is NOT Causation ­it is absolutely critical to bear in mind that correlations describe relations rather than  causation  ­we can’t tease out if x predicts y or y predicts x, we just know that x and y are associated ­correlations do not rule out third variable explanations for an association between  variables Illusory Correlation ­misperception that there is a statistical association between two variables when in reality  there is none ­we call this a false positive error! ­a study found a weak positive correlation between the amount of ice cream consumption,  and violent crimes committed on that day  ­we cant make causal inferences between these two variables ­there must be a third variable involved ­example 1: orphanage vs IQ scores, causation (how much education are they getting, no  social support) ­example 2: attending class vs grades, correlation (but there may also be other variables  involved) Confounding Variable: Variable Z ­a confound variable can change the size and reliability of the correlation between  variables x and y ­can make the co
More Less

Related notes for PSY 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit