Class Notes (786,821)
Canada (482,297)
Psychology (1,898)
PSY 102 (446)
Lecture

PSY102 CH 5 LECTURE.docx

7 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

School
Ryerson University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 102
Professor
Colleen Carney
Semester
Fall

Description
PSY102: Introduction to Psychology October 25, 2012 Week 8 Lecture Consciousness ­state of being awake ­abstract concept to define ­awareness to one’s surroundings and self ­our perception of something ­subjective experience ­it is relative to the individual ­depends on our thoughts, beliefs, past experiences Attention ­selective attention ­withdrawal of certain aspects of sensory environment ­focus of other aspects ­can we ignore a loud mobile phone conversation on the TTC while reading our book? ­divided attention (multitasking) ­attempts of doing more than one task at the same time  ­if we focus on one task we can perform the task better and quicker ­the more tasks we add in the more challenging it is to focus on the tasks ­controlled attention ­limited amount of cognitive resources ­tasks that require active focus ­we have a finite amount of brain power ­example: driving and talking on the phone, we cannot pay attention to both attentively so one task or the other is done weaker ­automatic processing ­requires little attentional capacity ­requires little conscious awareness ­allows divided attention to work Drugs and Consciousness ­psychoactive drugs ­chemicals similar to neurotransmitters ­changes chemical/electrical processes in neurons ­four types of drugs discussed:  ­depressants ­stimulants ­opiates ­psychedelics ­depressant drugs ­sedatives that decrease activity of central nervous system ­alcohol ­most widely used and abused drug (80% of Canadians) ­effects vary: stimulation (low doses) to sedation (high doses) ­alcohol addiction and withdrawal ­disorientation, confusion, terrifying visual hallucinations ­memory problems, agitation, sleep problems, tremor, hyperactivity ­when you drink you become really happy from normal, then go back to normal, then you  get depressed, and then you go back to normal ­we get the depressant effect because the alcohol effects how our brain  works ­stimulant drugs ­increase activity of central nervous  ­increases dopamine and serotonin ­highly addictive ­nicotine: alertness, concentration, relaxation ­cocaine: euphoria, enhanced, mental and physical capacities, decrease in hunger,  indifference to pain ­amphetamine: reduced fatigue, mood elevation, increased anxiety, aggression ­opiate narcotic drugs ­create a sense of euphoria ­analgesic effects: decreases in pain perception and reaction, increases in pain  tolerance ­can have sedative effects: increased sleep, decreased anxiety ­heroin, morphine, codeine ­psychedelic drugs ­hallucinogens that alter perception, mood, thoughts, sense of reality ­no sensory input available ­marijuana: ­most used illegal drug in Canada ­enhanced sensations of touch ­increased appreciation of sounds ­sense of time slowing down ­feelings of well­being ­may become quiet, introspective ­sleepy and hungry ­lysergic acid diethylamide ­11% of Canadians have tried LSD ­neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine ­ecstasy ­hallucinogenic and stimulant properties ­increases self­confidence, well­being, empathy for others ­increase blood pressure, nausea, blurred vision, memory loss ­permanent damage to serotonergic neurons Sleep: How much do we need? ­10 year longitudinal survey, of more than 104,000 people in Japan, found that those who  slept:  ­8+ hours a night were at greater risk of death! ­7 hours had best survival rate ­everyone does not need the same amount of sleep ­adolescents have greater sleep needs than adults Sleep ­circadian rhythm ­patterns of change ­occur on a (roughly) 24 cycle ­many biological processes: ­hormone release ­body temperature ­changes brain waves ­induction of drowsiness ­biological clock ­overseen by 20,000 neurons in hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic  nucleus ­increases in melatonin ­triggers sense of fatigue ­5 stages, cyclical process (we go through all five stages about 6­8 times) ­differs by “brain waves” ­takes about 90 minutes per cycle (stages 1­5) ­awake ­reliably generates brain oscillations of a certain frequency ­beta (12­30 Hz) waves ­alpha (8­12 Hz) waves ­stage 1 ­brain activity reduced by 50%  ­theta waves (4­7 Hz) ­less frequent and lower frequency than alpha waves ­4­5% of a night ­muscles twitches  ­stage 2 ­further decreases in brain activity but with: ­sleep spindles ­K­complexes ­loud noises can trigger K­complexes, without conscious  awareness of sound ­we can still hear and perceive things in our environment when were sleeping ­decreases in breathing, heart rates, body temperature ­compromises 45­55% of night ­stage 3 ­deep sleep, 4­6% of night ­generation of slow, large amplitude waves ­delta waves, 20­50% of the time ­if awoken during delta production, you feel groggy and disoriented ­stage 4 ­very deep sleep ­brain produces delta waves more than 50% of time ­12­15% of night ­rhythmic breathing ­very limited muscle activity ­stage 5 ­paradoxical sleep ­“wakelike” but sleeping ­brain waves are stage 2­like: speed up, high frequency, low amplitude ­heart rate increases ­breating is rapid and shallow ­20­25% of night ­REM sleep ­rapid eye movements (REM) ­darting of the eyes ­sleep time when most dreams occur ­brain is active, but body is not ­brain stem and muscle paralysis ­four of five periods of REM sleep ­length of time increases with each subsequent cycle throughout night ­REM accompanied by “MEMA’ ­middle ear muscle activity Sleep and Dreams ­more dreams occur during REM vs. non­REM  ­REM sleep dreams: more emotional, illogical, and prone to sudden shifts in  plot ­no
More Less

Related notes for PSY 102

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit