Class Notes (838,025)
Canada (510,638)
Sociology (2,265)
SOC 104 (195)
Lecture

SOC 103- Lecture .docx

10 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 104
Professor
Tonya Davidson
Semester
Fall

Description
SOC 103 LECTURE 3 Tuesday September 10, 2013 Sociological Theory  Social Theories  ­Models to test and offers generalizations Epistemology: the study of ways of knowing  Classical Social Theory 1840’s­1920s The Enlightment ­ when science was born Political Revolutions American Revolution –  French Revolution – over throwing of the French monarchy gave birth to new political system ; young capitalism  theme  The Industrial Revolution Gave birth to factories and mass production  THREE KEY EFFECTS 1. Dramatic, rapid urbanization – with new technology, things change; family models change (e.g. nuclear  family); changed how work is divided among family; role of religion is decreasing  2. Change in family relations/ gender relations 3. Increased secularization  SCALE SCHOOL PERSON EPISTEMOLOGY Macro  Functionalist Consensus Durkheim ­ social facts ­multivariate analysis Macro Conflict Marx ­ historical comparative  Mirco Interpretivism Weber  ­ participant observation ­ enthnography ­ subjectivity 7 SINS 1. greed 2. envy 3. wrath 4. lust (e.g. strip clubs ) 5. gluttony  6. sloth 7. pride Emile Durkeim (1858­1917) ­ was a positivist ; we could use our natural science methods ; believed in imperial and an objective truth that  can be found (e.g. is colour a real thing?) ­ interested in the transition from to modern society  ­ “ is it possible to have social solidarity…  (how can we get along in big cities as to villages) ­ modern and traditional societies can be equally solidated   Social Fact ­ to help sociologist ­ social facts can be social factors or social ideas ­ not individually come up with ­ his mythological interventions ­ affects individuals actions, behaviours and thoughts ­ e.g. religion, fashion/modes of dress, education  Lecture 4 Thursday September 12, 2013 Karl Marx (1818­1883) ­ historical materialism ­ labour theory of value ­ ideology  Historical Materialism (historical parative theory for Marx in the textbook) ­ “the history is all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles” (The Communist Manifesto, 1848) ­> human history is the result of human action ­> human action is determined by material realities  ­ moves in shifts of the economic systems ( how history unfolds) Dialectics of History ­ primitive communism ­ feudalism (land ownership imerged ; people own stuff cause they were born with it; e.g. wealth) ­ capitalism (Marx said that the dialectics of history that they have become so successful that they destroy themselves at  one point) ­> ­ communism  exploitation is when the workers are denied the true value of their labour ­ ideology works when we take for granted the ideas used for us by the people by power and these ideas work towards  their interest  ­ interested how broad institutions like school and religion… called the superstructures  MOLSON CANADIANA VIDEO  How does the video example ideologies  ­ producing tis ideological idea that white men like Joe are common here QUESTIONS Im a positivist – D Society is like a body­ D VAber I am the founder of micro sociology­ vaber Interested in social solidarity­ D I am German – V&Marx My writing is used to globalize Historical materialism ­ marx Lecture 5 Tuesday, September 17, 2013 Methods, Ethics and Socialization  Part One: 1. Research Design • research problems • research questions  • Literature view* • Consider epistemological (the study of ways of knowing; theory effects what  methods that you’re going to use; how you understand truth and knowledge) and  theoretical orientations • Choose methods • Collect data • Analyze data • Present data  Quantitative Qualitative ­ Positivist orientations ­Interpretivist orientations ­ begins with hypothesis and why questions  ­ beings with what and how questions (relationships btwn variables) ­ to explore phenomena ­ to explain phenomena, to test hypothesis ­ inductive reasoning ­ Deductive reasoning ­ Idiographic explanation ­ Nomothetic explanations ­> exhaustive explanations ­> single explanation ­> small sample tests ­> large sample sizes ­Methods include ­ Methods include: ­> surveys ­> surveys ­> interviewing ­> interviewing ­> content analysis ­? Content analysis ­> Participant observation (fieldwork) ­The method (nomothetic or idiographic) depends on the question  Quantitative Methods: Key Concepts Hypothesis:  ­ in quantitative research one beings with a testable story ­ a tentative statement about a particular relationship that can be tested empirically Variables: ­ Independent Variable; can be varied or manipulated ­ Dependent Variable; is the reaction (or lack thereof) of the manipulation Operational Definition: Survey Design ­Types of Data ­> demographic ­> social environment ­> activities ­> opinions & attitudes ­Using Extant Data ­> Statistics Canada ­> The census long form – how many rooms in your house? How do you usually get to work? How many hours of unpaid  domestic labourssssz to do you a day? 69 ­Survey Designs ­> cross­sectional ­> longitudinal ­> trend ­> c ­Key Issues in Survey Design  Example of Quantitative Research: ­ Michael Haan (2007) “The Place of Place: Location and Immigrant Economic Well­Being Independent Variable: city of settlement ­> Gateway cities: Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver ­> Non­Gateway cities Dependent Variable: economic well­being 1) Employment status 2) Income 3) Employment mismatch  Qualitative Research Mo The writing about culture – Ethnology  Harriet Martineau 1) do not rush to conclusions 2) do not generalize from limited observations 3) recognize that observations are approximations to the truth ; Erving Goffman e.g. how is participant observation Lecture 6 Thursday September 19, 2013 Ethics  1. Respect for Persons (e.g. a poor family; a researcher comes and asks to go a survey for $50) 2. Concern for Welfare (have to warn them of long term affects e.g. psychological problems;  confidentiality)  3. Justice Ethics in Research ­ In Stanley Milgram’s Obedience study (1961) ­> Deception for used because they didn’t not know the real experiment ­> Concern for Welfare; the partcipants did not know that the actors were can’t but now they have power to  do that ­ Phillip Zimbardo and the Standard Prison Experiment (1971) ­ Laud Humphrey’s (1975) Tearoom Trade  ­> Concern for Welfare; involuntary; no confidentiality  Part II: Introducing Socialization  Defining Socialization  ­ on going life process of how to be functional members of society  ­“ the process by which people learn to become members of society” (Wilson 2009, p.58) ­ it makes you you and what society expects of you  4 Types of Socialization 1. Primary Socialization (infant to teenagers; intentional and unintentional) 2. Secondary Socialization (on going in life; new job, new status roles like parent) 3. Anticipatory Socialization ( the process of imaginary and preparing for new roles e.g. boot camp) 4. Resocialization (interventions, people leaving jail, people in therapy) Theories of Socialization 1. Functionalism ­followers of Durkheim ­ Talcott Parsons ­Parsons on the Family ­> Socialization functions ­> socialization of children; adult socialization ­> Gender functions ­> male instrumental role; female expressive role Critics of Parsons ­restirctive gender roles (male can be expressive and female can be instrumental) ­ back then, one single income was okay but now both parents are going to work so  dual income ­ back then, a family w
More Less

Related notes for SOC 104

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit