Class Notes (834,807)
Canada (508,727)
Sociology (2,254)
SOC 808 (118)
Lecture

SOC808 Week 10

5 Pages
147 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 808
Professor
Mustafa Koc
Semester
Fall

Description
SOC808 F2013 LECTURE THEME FOR WEEK 10 HUNGER IN A WORLD OF PLENTY Some estimates indicate that around the world we produce enough food to offer about  3500 calories per person each day. Yet even in advanced industrial countries with strong  agricultural export economies such as Canada we have hunger. Around the world,  currently 1 billion people is estimated to go without sufficient foods. This is about the  same amount of people who are estimated to suffer high weights and obesity.  Hunger may seem to be inevitable in a world with ever increasing numbers of people. But  is it really the population that is the cause of hunger. Some like, Thomas Malthus would  think so. According to Malthus, if unchecked population increases at a geometric rate  (i.e. 2, 4, 8, 16, etc.) whereas the food supply grows at an arithmetic rate (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4,  etc.) This lead a gap in the long run. According to Malthus only natural causes (i.e. accidents and old age), misery (war,  pestilence, and famine), moral restraint and vice (such as infanticide, murder,  contraception and homosexuality) could check excessive population growth.  Malthus  favoured “moral restraint” (late marriage and abstinence) Industrial revolution and green revolutions showed that Malthus seemed to worry for no  reason. World productive capacity increased significantly. But, by 1960s, old Malthusian  ideas were re­introduced by neo­Malthusians such as Paul Ehrlich (Population Bomb,  1968). Other demographers such as Mamdani (1972), pointed out that poor people are not poor  because they have more children, but they have more children because they are poor. For  the poor each child may be considered as an extra hand to help the family and as old age  insurance. But for educated, middle class people marriages would take place at later and  they would consider each child as a certain amount of expense, thus they will be more  inclined to smaller families. Demographic transition theory seems to support this  position. By following demographic patterns of economically developed countries they  argue that there actually is a tendency from high birth rates and death rates to lower birth  and death rates as a country develops economically.   12 myths of hunger Frances Moore Lappé and Joseph Collins in their book Food First( 1977) challenged  some of the dominant myths about the origins of hunger. The myths most people  mistakenly believe about the causes of hunger according to Lappé and Collins include:  Not Enough Food to Go Around   Nature's to Blame for Famine   Too Many People   Efforts to feed the hungry are causing the environmental crisis   The Green Revolution is the Answer   We Need Large Farms   The Free Market Can End Hunger   Free Trade is the Answer   Because the poor is too Hungry to fight for their rights we need to help them  foreign aid is a cure  We benefit from their poverty   Curtail Freedoms to End Hunger  Causes of Hunger  There are competing theoretical explanations for the cause of hunger. While some points  out the blame to the deficiencies of the countries that suffer hunger mostly, others argue  that the patterns of inequalities on a global scale as well as within the Third World, and  the organization, current practices of the global economic powers and market forces are  the real causes of continuation of hunger. • Lack of access to means of livelihoods: o means of production (land, water, labour, implements) o jobs/income o poverty • Lack of power: o sovereignty o rights, entitlements (Sen)  • Lack of knowledge/skills • Social and natural disruptions that destroy societies’ capacity to feed their  members: wars, civil wars, epidemics, natural disasters such as earthquakes,  hurricanes, marker crushes Hunger in Canada:  According to the National Population Health Survey about 15 percent of  Canadians, were considered to be living in a "food­insecure" household at some  point during 2000/01  a significant jump from the figures from the previous survey which claimed that  10.2 % of Canadian population were food insecure   corporate and government restructuring since the 1980s resulted in decline in the  manufacturing sector, weakened collective bargaining, widened the gap between  the rich and the poor. Cutbacks in key government programs also worsened the  situation for middle and working class families and marginalized segments of the  populations (the elderly, the poor, people with disabilities, aboriginal peoples,  new comers and racialized minorities.  First food bank in Canada opened in 1981 and since than the numbers of people  relying on foodbanks kept increasing. Tarasuk and Eakin: • many donations food banks distribute are ‘‘surplus’’ food that cannot be retailed • the handling of industry donations of unsaleable products is a labor­intensive  activity, made possible by the availability of unpaid labor in food banks, the  neediness of food bank clients, and clients’ lack of rights in this system. • food banks are not only an adjunct to the social assistance (welfare) system in, but  that they contribute to ‘‘corporate welfare.’’ • In their efforts to salvage as much edible food as possible, food bank workers  routinely eschew the aesthetic values that dominate our retail system. • Clients could take or leave what food was offered to them. • Many clients associate t
More Less

Related notes for SOC 808

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit