Class Notes (835,629)
Canada (509,297)
Archaeology (315)
ARCH 131 (179)
Lecture

ARCHEOLOGY 131.docx

15 Pages
158 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Archaeology
Course
ARCH 131
Professor
Dennis Sandgathe
Semester
Spring

Description
Arch 131 Lecture 4 01/23/2014 Arch 131 Week 1 Monday Archeology­ study of past cultures through material culture remains Cultural Anthropology­ study of living cultures Physical/Biological Anthropology­ study of human biological evolution and human remains Linguisitics­study of languages  ALLS GOAL IS TO UNDERSTAND PEOPLE Archaeologist will want to know why humans wanted to make tools and how they used them Physical/biological anthropology will ask why they started to make the tool. ­changes in the brain or wrists? 50 years ago it was assumed that we were just special animals Unit 1; Intro to Human Origins History of Human Origins Research Arab scholars helped a lot to discover many things Oldest Universities  Al­Azhar University,Cario est. 975 AD University of Al­Karaouine, Fes, Morocco est. 859 AD Irish Archbishop James Ussher (1581­1656) said world began in 4004 BC Biblical scholar. Created a genealogy tree dated back to Adam and eve. Said the world was created on October 23  at 9 a.m Thursday Charles Darwin came up with the idea of evolution, and came up with a mechanism to explain how it  occurred If you look at any animal or plant species they produce far more offspring that can survive Alfred Russel Wallace (Came up with natural selection as well, let Darwin take most of the credit)  Thomas Henry Huxley (probably the most smartest guy in his era) loved to debate ideas, when he became  familiar with darwin’s theory of natural selection, he became a big supporter Neandertal remains found 1888 I think. Ancestors, but not that different from us, missing link between great  apes and neandertal . Evoltion is not linear, it is a lot more complicated, a lot of branches and lose ends. Eugine Dubois (dutch physician), believed arangatangs was a good choice for ancestors for us. Looked for  remains in java. Failure  Arthur Keith, & Marcellin Boule: think humans are really special, and we are nothing like neandtrals,  convinced neandertals are not our ancestors, and said to keep looking for fossils for our real ancestors Neandertals are not our direct ancestors, a lot more muscular, a lot more robust  1900’s: The view of evolution is getting filled in, fossils are being found  Leakey family: hunting for fossils in east Africa 1930­present Darwin: not survival of the fittest, correct term is survival of the fit.  Early research tool. Taxonomy(arrangement) Unit 3­Genentics   3.1 Inheritance and Mendel’s Principals The mechanism of Inheritance of traits Darwin knew something was up Blending of traits. Breeding or Arificial Selection   ­putting two things together to get a new product ­ex. Corn­ wild corn + ancient domestic corn=modern corn Heckrind­ A recreated version of the extinct species Aurochs GEORGE MENDEL(1822­184) 1850s Research on Plant Hybridization What Mendel Saw Generation 3 will have 75% of one trait and 25% of another Each parent also giving up a particle. One particle is dominant over another Medel’s Hypothesis Each parent contains both a dominant and recessive “particle” for the trait in question.   Has 50/50 chance on which particle will be passed on. Just 4 possible combiantions: Sw+Sw= SS or Sw or wS or ww Today we refer to the particles of each trait as alleles. AN allele is an alternate form of a specific gene. Homozygous dominat­ having 2 of the dominant form of an allele Heterozygous: having 1 dominant and 1 recessive form Homozygous recessive: having 2 of the recessive form of an allele Monohybrid Corsses vs. Dihybrid Crosses  Mono­ crossing two plants that doffer in only one characteristic   Di­ crosses where the parent plants differed in 2 different characteristics  Mendels Principles 1. The Principle of Segregation ­ Offspring inherit one discrete unit for a trait from each parent ­ These units maintain their unique integrity from generation to genreration 2. The principle of Dominance and Recessivness a. Some expressions of a specific trair were dominant over others 3. The Principle of Independent Assortment a. Different traits were not inherited together as packages. They passed form generation to  generation as independent units.  Problems Mendel lucked out…. He selected traits that are influenced by single genes in the chromosomes of plea plants. Theses  are called monogenic traits.   Some of his relsuts were contrary to his principle of independence assortment  The traits Mendel examined were types that are expressed as discrete categories … CELL BIOLOGY AND GENETICS Prokaryotic cells 3.8 billion years ago­DNA floats around Eukaryotic Cells­alage appeared 1.5 billion years go­Nucleus protects DNA Plasma membrane controls what goes out and what comes in Cytoplasm­ Nucleus Mitochondria Ribosomes Endoplasmic reticulum  Proteins Complex molecules composed of different amino acid chains and have a wide variety of functions: serve as structural molecules in the formation of new cells and bodies acts as transport moelecules for moving materials about the cell and between clells serve as antibodies for fighting foreign bodies such as bacteria that cause infections serves as enzymes that facilitate chemical reaction in the body  serve as hormones­important regulator of body functions  1 phosphate 1 sugar 1 nitrogeneius base = a neucliotide   Bases Purine Adenine(A) Guanine(G) Pyrimidines Thymine(T) Cytocine(C) Gene: a gene is a set swquence of nitrogenous bases( out of the whole DNA sequence) that code for a  specific protein DNA replication –chromosomes are differnent section of entire DNA sequence Chromosomes form right before cell division Humans usually have 46 chromosomes (23 pairs)­diploid number 23 come from father and 23 form mother each matching pair is called homologous chromosomes  the first 22 pairs are called autosomes last set is the sex chromosomes to determine gender Each chromosome carries different genes: A gene refers to a specific location or locus along a chromosome Each gene includes two alleles, one from each parent’s genetic contribution  Alleles  Alleles are different versions of a specific gene Different alleles may code for conflicting traits(short
More Less

Related notes for ARCH 131

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit