Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Criminology (2,168)
CRIM 101 (452)
Lecture

Crim 101 - lecture notes week 9.docx

3 Pages
71 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRIM 101
Professor
Adrienne Peters
Semester
Fall

Description
PRECURSORS TO FAMILY VIOLENCE • Family is social setting that provides many opportunities for conflict • Family life tends to be regarded as “private” life; friends, neighbors, and even  police, may be reluctant to interfere •  Families and households are often hierarchical or in­egalitarian in nature • Parents have more power than children • Use (and abuse) of physical “discipline” or force has historically been more  widely tolerated in family setting SPOUSAL ABUSE • Rates of spousal violence remained relatively stable between 1999 GSS and 1998  GSS • Men and women report similar amounts of spousal violence • Women much more likely to be choked, beaten or threatened with weapon; men  more likely to be slapped, kicked, shoved or hit RISK FACTORS • Three times as high for those living in common­law relationship and for those  who had been living together for less than three years • People under age 25 were five times were more likely to experience spousal  violence than those over age 45 • Partner being heavy drinker • Being an aboriginal TRANSACTIONS • Most violent transactions take place in home, primarily during evening, or late at  night • Time when all or almost all of family members are behind closed doors OTHER TEMPORAL FACTORS • Holidays are good and stressful times • Holidays can be stressful for money • More alcohol THE AFTERMATH • Consequences tend to be more serious for women than for men • Women three times more likely than men to fear for their lives, and/ or to  interrupt their daily activities • Women more likely to have been repeat victims of spousal violence, and three  time more likely to be killed by their male partner COST OF ABUSE • 2011 study by UBC nursing prof. ASSAULTS AGAINST CHILDREN • Approximately 60% of assaults against children under age of six are committed  by family members • Close to two­thirds of those assaults are committed by parents (including step­ parents, foster­parents, and adoptive parents) • Two­thirds of homicides against children and youth also committed by close  family member; 60% committed by father and 32% by mother ABDUCTIONS OF CHILDREN • ~54% of all abductions are parental abductions • ~26% are stranger abductions • ~60% of parental abductors are fathers PRECURSORS • In most cases of physical assault and homicide against children and youth, main  contributing factor (or precursor) is either frustration or an argument • Young children and female children/ youth more likely to be assaulted in private  dwelling (usually their own home) • Males over age of 11 more likely to be assaulted on streets, at school, in parking  lots, or in other public places CONSEQUENCES (AFTERMATH) • ~40% of physical and ~70% sexual assaults of children/youth do not result in  injuries of any kind • If they are injured, most involve minor injuries that do not require medical  treatment • Long­term consequences of family related­violence against children and youth  should not be underestimated • Abused children and youth more likely to be aggressive, abus
More Less

Related notes for CRIM 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit