Class Notes (834,352)
Canada (508,509)
EASC 104 (11)
Lecture

Easc lecture #8 & #9 Mass Wasting.docx

4 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Earth Sciences
Course
EASC 104
Professor
Brent Ward
Semester
Fall

Description
Mass wasting - One of the biggest driving forces is the slope steeper the slope, the more likely there will be a landslide o Depends on the types of materials on the slope and the climate Landslides - Many landslides happen especially in remote areas Slope (in) stability - when slopes are over steepened - slopes are debuttressed - for many landslides, it is the accumulation of water that creates water pressure which then can trigger the landslide Classification of landslides - regolith ( more common in USA)—intensely weathered bedrock - We also classify landslides by the amount of water content—whether it is dry or more wet Type of material - Something that is completely unconsolidated  sand o If completely loose and consolidated, it will not stand up steep - Great amount of water can decrease the cohesion - If there is clay, it will help hold the material together to stand up steeper Type of motion - Debris flow is what often blocks highways - Earth flow, it flows like a decries flow but doesn’t flow as rapidly Landslides: role of water - Adding more water to material increase pore water pressure - If in an area with clay minerals, the clay can absorb this water Rock slide and rock avalanches - Usually when material moves down slop and may break up but does not come fully mixed o More rapid types of rock failure: rock avalanches  the mixing then increases Creep (sackung) - Sakung caused because the rocks move slowly down; the slow movement then creates a catastrophic failure Toppling - Rapid movement that can trigger a large landslide Unconsolidated mass movement: creep - Pistol butted tree—thickening at the bottom of the tree that causes the tree to grow straight o Shows us that the slope is steep Unconsolidated mass movement: slump - The rotating surface causes the material to curve back into the slope - Also classified as a slump—quick clay Factors contributing to increased risk of landslides - Vegetation removal: rotting roots affects the cohesion of the slope  cohesion is the tendency for things to stick together - Undercutting slopes: rivers undercutting the slopes - Watering lawns or septic system o Water from swimming pools seeping in to the cracks of the creep which can cause a landslide - Cut and fill: e.g. road building -- when the original s
More Less

Related notes for EASC 104

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit