Class Notes (835,242)
Canada (509,043)
Psychology (1,556)
PSYC 330 (93)
Lecture 9

PSYC 330 - Lecture 9 - The Development of the Brain - March 25th, 2014.docx

7 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 330
Professor
Richard Wright
Semester
Spring

Description
PSYC 330 March 25 , 2014 Lecture Nine: The Development of the Brain Attention Across the Lifespan (Lecture that Prof Cancelled) There are certain things we can do with attention that is innate straight from birth and  there are things that take time to get good at (on average: 6­10 years) ­ Things we’re good at from birth, we stay good at them for our entire lives. ­ Things that take us time (around 6­10 years) to get good at  ▯Declines as we age. Part I: “Last­In/First­Out” Principle (LIFO) ­ Computer science analogy ­ Programming analogy ­ Fits in with the LIFO principle The LIFO Principle ­ Sensory operations are reflexively triggered by external events and function in “brand  new” humans as though they are part of our “hardwiring” ­ Cognitive operations take time to develop, are more strategic, and can be thought of as  skills that are learned and that are not fully developed at birth (requires both practice and  further physiological development of the cortical areas involved) • Reading • Deductive/Inductive Reasoning • Problem Solving • Filtering (engagement) component of selective attention also appears to  require physiological development of cortical areas ­ When applied to attentional development  ▯the sensory aspects of attention are the first  to develop, will also be the first to disappear Development of Cortical Neurons ­ The development of cortical area functioning lags behind the development of  subcortical area functioning • Researchers have been able to test Posner’s Proposal (1988): Attentional  processing is carried out by a network of different cortical and subcortical  areas  If subcortical areas like the midbrain/superior colliculus are fully  developed first, then functioning of this component of the  attentional network should be more evident than functioning of  cortical components like the posterior parietal lobe  Superior Colliculus (SC) is the mechanism that locates external  visual events and initiates saccadic eye movements and shifts of  the attentional focal point to those locations  It seems reasonable to expect that our capacity for executing  stimulus­driven saccades and attention shifts in response to  external events, and our capacity for exhibiting IOR will develop  sooner than operations associated with cortical functioning ­ Newborn brain changes drastically in the first years of life PSYC 330 March 25 , 2014 • Connections are being made (Brain Interconnectivity) • Significant change between cortical networks and brain areas as babies  ages • Big significant improvement in visual acuity • Sticky Fixation in Babies (One­Month Olds)  Checkerboard Pattern  ▯Babies cannot disengage their attention and   therefore they are stuck fixating on the “noisy” pattern  ▯causing  them to be distressed/bothered Part II: Physiology of the Developing Brain Studying Orienting in Young Children ­ Making the assumption that where the baby is looking is where they are directing their  attention (Overtly, not covertly) • One of the main ways to measure attention in babies ­ There are special challenges that must be overcome in order to study attention  processing in infants and young children • Subjects are too young to understand experimental instructions • Subjects are not content to sit still very long or to participate in an  experiment without distraction • Researches must make inferences about attentional processing primarily  on the basis of overt orienting responses • The distractibility of infants can be used to the experimenter’s advantage  The Orienting Reflex is pronounced in infants  The sudden appearance of a stimulus in an infant’s visual periphery  will usually cause orienting of gaze toward it  Studies of Visual Orienting in Infants typically involve: - The use of sudden external events as stimuli - Sufficient novelty of these events so that subjects do not  habituate to their onset Studying Attention Orienting with Selective Looking: Infant Selective Looking  Experiment ­ Method: A baby sits inside a testing chamber and looks at a toy that appeared through  an opening in the chamber in the centre of the field of view  ­ Results: • The baby’s attention is drawn to the toy in much the same way adult  subjects can consciously focus their gaze and attention on a central  fixation cross in a location cue experiment • Toys attract the baby’s attention because they find it interesting (especially  mechanical ones that move) • The toy begins to disappear through the opening while a striped pattern  appears within another opening • Findings: PSYC 330 March 25 , 2014  The baby then turns to inspect it  ▯the baby will eventually lose  interest in this stimulus if it remains in the field of view for an  extended period of time or if it is presented over and over - The fact that its onset was detected and that it was  inspected after its first appearance - This indicated that the baby has localized the stimulus and  initiated head/eye movements towards it  ▯when this  happens, the baby’s eyes widen with surprise and interest - Babies habituate the stimuli very fast  ▯get bored easily  until the next stimulus is presented - Can’t use PET scans due to radiation, fMRI is fine Part III: Studying Attention in Infants Age Groups ­ Picking the modal age groups ­ 5 years old, 10 years old, young adults and adults were mostly used to compare Dichotic Listening Task  ▯Auditory Filtering ­ Lots of studies have been done in the developmental psychology literature is when  comparing these types of tasks in different life stages ­ Results: • Little kids are not good at switching attention (5 year olds are not as good  as 10 year olds or young adults) • Elderly are not good at switching attention (Comparable to little kids) • Younger adults are efficient at both visual and auditory filtering tasks  Faster and more accurate at focusing attention  Stroop Effect Task Study ­ Most common visual filtering task to carry out ­ Young group (7 years old) ­ Method: Naming the ink colour, words are incongruent with the ink colour ­ Results:  • Young people and elderly get stroop interference • 10 year olds and young adults are better and get less stroop interference • There is more brain activation in older people (working harder) Negative Priming Study ­ Method: Focusing on an object (drawing in solid black lines) while ignoring an  overlapping image (drawing in dashed lines)  • If the non­object was the object to be recognized in the next trial, the  subjects would not notice it ­ Results: Little kids and elderly are not very good f
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 330

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit