Class Notes (835,638)
Canada (509,305)
Psychology (1,556)
PSYC 391 (84)
Lecture

psyc 391 readings.docx

11 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 391
Professor
Peter Tingling
Semester
Spring

Description
psyc 391 readings 01/14/2014 Apocalypse soon? (reading 1)  ­ people have a just world belief that their environment is a safe and stable place. global warming issues  threaten this belief and people react by employing defensive responses, through dismissal or rationalization  of the information.  Experiment: hold the level of just world beliefs people have, measured levels of skepticism regarding global  warning after being exposed to different types of global warming messages.  Study 1 ­ does dire global warming messages actually promote skepticism among individuals with strong just world  beliefs?  Study 2  ­ dire messages can increase skepticism regarding global warming by contradicting individuals’ underlying  just world belief.    Results:  ­ participants who were primed with just world statements reported high levels of global warming skepticism  than those who were primed with unjust world statements.  ­ dire messages lead to increased global warming skepticism because they conflict with just world beliefs  ­ those primed with just world statements reported less willingness to change their lifestyle to reduce their  carbon footprint than did those primed with unjust world statements.  ­ the same dire messages should be coupled with a potential solution, the information can be  communicated without created a substantial threat.  ­ our results complement recent research showing that framing environmentalism as patriotic can  successfully increase proenvironmental behavioral intentions in individuals most attached to the status quo.  Conclusion:  ­ global warming messages should not contradict with individual’s deeply held beliefs.  01/14/2014 Reading 2 ( the emergency of climate change)  01/14/2014 Latane and darley’s (1970) model of helping behavior in an emergency to the issue of climate change.  ­ the model provides an integrative framework that highlights the relevance to climate change of disparate  research areas.  Latane and darley (1970) proposed that in order for someone to help, five criteria must be met. They also  propose an overarching cost/benefit analysis that impacts whether or not a person will engage in helping.  First step:  ­ potential helper must notice the event in question. ­ however, many emergencies lack salience in our lives.  ­ characteristics of the helper also makes a difference: a potential helper who is in a hurry or is highly self­ absorbed may not notice the distressed other.  Second step: ­ requires the potential helper to interpret the event as an emergency situation. Emergency events are often  ambigious ­ our reliance on others for information and our need for approval can both facilitate and serve as a barrier  to helping.  third step:  ­ requires individuals to feel a sense of personal responsibility to aid the distressed other.  ­ one key determinant of feeling responsible is having a sense of “we­ness” or connectedness to the victim.  ­> smaller groups, similarity of the person to the distressed other, and taking the victim’s perspective all  contribute ot a sense of connection  ­ any key determinant of feeling responsible is having no one else to rely on. ( diffusion of responsibility)  01/14/2014 fourth step:  ­ knowing what to do  fifth step:  ­ actually deciding to act are also required before help will be given in an emergency.  ­ people will not help if they feel that their personal resources are insufficient to effectively cope with the  emergency. Instead, they are likely to deny personal responsibility.  * factors that enhance a person’s sense of empowerment or self­efficacy tends to promotes helping  behavior. As well as information that provides people with effective ideas of how to address an emergency  situation.  Psychological processes of each stage are intertwined and affect each other. Society level  structural( policy) changes beget individual level psychological changes.  ­ key to successful action is collective action( at both the society and psychological level)  ­ stage 1: noticing the event  ­ taking steps to psychologically decrease the distance between the potential helper and the emergency  may also help people to notice climate change.  Step 2 : interpreting the event as an emergency  ­ humans are not objective and passive processors of information ­ fears, desires and goals influence strongly how they evaluate and weigh evidence( fiske & taylor, 2007)  ­ communication designed to arouse fear often backfire, unless coupled with recommendations.  ­individuals are impacted by the way others react in an emergency situation; they rely on other for  information. Seeing others make efforts to reduce their carbon footprint may prove to be effective in helping  to establish that the threat of climate change requires immediate action  01/14/2014 ­ cognitive dissonance ­ optimism can also lead people to fail to perceive an event as an emergency. Optimism makes  people believe that nothing negative will happen to them stage 3: feeling personally responsible to act  ­ responsibility is subjectively defined  ­ all cultures have a responsibility norm: an understanding about who and what we are responsible  for  ­ cognitive dissonance: individuals are motivated to perceive it is someone else’s job  ­ when the magnitude of the emergency is greater than the personal resources available to an  individual, the potential helper is likely to engage in defensive attribution and not accept responsibility  for the emergency Lazarus and Folkman(1984) there are two coping strategies:  ­ problem focused: taking action to confront a threat ­ emotion focused coping : ignoring or denying the threat how do people decide which form to choose? People’s perception of control  ­ more perceived control, more likely to choose problem focused coping  mckenzie mohr and smith(1999): sense of perceived control is largely impacted by our sense of  community  ­ acting in concert with others leads people to have greater sense of self efficacy( personal control),  thus, less likely to engage in defensive denial of responsibility or emotion focused coping  ­ sense of perceived control ­>increase in self­efficicacy­> problem focused coping  01/14/2014 we an also increase feelings of responsibility to U.S citizens sense of connection to nature. ­> research  on prosocial behavior consistently demonstrates that feeling connected to others increases willingness  to help. ( either going outside, looking out a window, spending time in greenhouse..) increasing individual’s knowledge about an issue, although intuitively appealing, is not
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 391

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit