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Lecture 28

ART 142 Lecture 28: March 28 2016
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5 Pages
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Winter 2017

Department
Art
Course Code
ART 142
Professor
Arthur Sparks
Lecture
28

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March 28/ 2016
Art in Europe Between the World Wars, continued:
Constantin Brancusi, Sleeping Muse and the Newborn:
- wanted to simplify everything
Sleeping Muse:
- simplified oval head
- nose
- ears
- lightly indicated eyes
- sculpture
The Newborn:
- simple oval; suggests the idea of an egg
- could be a head; wedge shape indicates nose
- if newborn, could be a wide open crying mouth
- Brancusi said this sculpture should always be on a low plinth, so we look down on it
Brancusi, Bird in Space:
- Romanian folk tales contain a magical golden bird
- bird in flight; beak could be at one end, tail at the other
- meant to be placed on a very high pedestal
- simplified abstraction useful to influence 20th century sculpture
- compares his creation of primal form to God’s creation of primal form
North America Between the World Wars:
- Nude descending a staircase was exhibited in America
- many critics hated the show, but it brought new ideas from Europe
Man Ray, Cadeau:
- made sculptures following surrealist tradition; Dada
- spent most of his life working in Paris
- attaches a line of rails to an iron; made the iron useless > becomes a work of art
- unnerving; looks like a weapon
Man Ray, Untitled:
- also a photographer
- came up with photogram; didn’t use comma, but put objects on photo paper and exposed it to
light
- slinky; drinking glass; block; smudge at top might be crumpled paper
- exposed for less time = brighter
- makes recognizable items flat and patternlike; Dada and surrealism
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Joan Miro, Painting:
- european
- tried to remove from the real world, but with subconscious associations
- automatism; accessing the subconscious mind > would cut piece out of catalogues (these
in particular were machine parts) and toss them on the canvas. Traced around them, and
then painted, outlined and filled to various degrees
- Slightly biomorphic
Alexander Calder, Lobster:
- took Miro’s idea, but created mobiles
- cut metal shapes and hung them on chains; perfectly balanced
- fish tails and lobster traps
- moved in the wind; expressed the energy of the universe
Joseph Stella, The Voice of the City:
- Duchamp came to New York, struck by the skyscrapers
- saw them as an emblem of the future
- Stella took this modern future view and painted it
- idea of constant light
- abstracted images of skyscrapers and beams of light
- middle panel flat iron building; border paintings are of broadway; far left Hudson river, far right
Brooklyn bridge
- tall panel in the middle with side panels = looks like altarpiece
- worshipping progress; science as the new religion
Georgia O’Keefe, Black Iris III:
- many believed American art was based in nature, not technology
- 3 ft. tall; magnification of nature leads to abstraction
- liked photography, and especially close up
- floral images suggest female genitalia
- later painted skyscrapers to prove she could paint what was typically a male subject
Grant Wood, American Gothic:
- New York became the central art hub
- in the midwest, a group of artists turned back to old styles; American regionalism (regional
flavour)
- not an actual portrait; idealized view of American pioneers that created America
- farmer and his unmarried daughter
- hardworking, God fearing original pioneers
- Carpenter gothic style house (gothic architecture made of wood); suggests religious belief
and medieval outlook
- pitchfork = hard work and defence
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

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Description
find more resources at oneclass.com March 28/ 2016 Art in Europe Between the World Wars, continued: Constantin Brancusi, Sleeping Muse and the Newborn: - wanted to simplify everything Sleeping Muse: - simplified oval head - nose - ears - lightly indicated eyes - sculpture The Newborn: - simple oval; suggests the idea of an egg - could be a head; wedge shape indicates nose - if newborn, could be a wide open crying mouth - Brancusi said this sculpture should always be on a low plinth, so we look down on it Brancusi, Bird in Space: - Romanian folk tales contain a magical golden bird - bird in flight; beak could be at one end, tail at the other - meant to be placed on a very high pedestal - simplified abstraction useful to influence 20th century sculpture - compares his creation of primal form to God’s creation of primal form North America Between the World Wars: - Nude descending a staircase was exhibited in America - many critics hated the show, but it brought new ideas from Europe Man Ray, Cadeau: - made sculptures following surrealist tradition; Dada - spent most of his life working in Paris - attaches a line of rails to an iron; made the iron useless —> becomes a work of art - unnerving; looks like a weapon Man Ray, Untitled: - also a photographer - came up with photogram; didn’t use comma, but put objects on photo paper and exposed it to light - slinky; drinking glass; block; smudge at top might be crumpled paper - exposed for less time = brighter - makes recognizable items flat and patternlike; Dada and surrealism find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com Joan Miro, Painting: - european - tried to remove from the real world, but with subconscious associations - automatism; accessing the subconscious mind —> would cut piece out of catalogues (these in particular were machine parts) and toss them on the canvas. Traced around them, and then painted, outlined and filled to various degrees - Slightly biomorphic Alexander Calder, Lobster: - took Miro’s idea, but created mobiles - cut metal shapes and hung them on chains; perfectly balanced - fish tails and lobster traps - moved in the wind; expressed the energy of the universe Joseph Stella, The Voice of the City: - Duchamp came to New York, struck by the skyscrapers - saw them as an emblem of the future - Stella took this modern future view and painted it - idea of constant light - abstracted images of skyscrapers and beams of light - middle panel flat iron building; border paintings are of broadway; far left Hudson river, far right Brooklyn bridge - tall panel in the middle with side panels = looks like altarpiece - worshipping progress; science as the new religion Georgia O’Keefe, Black Iris III: - many believed American art was based in nature, not technology - 3 ft. tall; magnification of nature leads to abstraction - liked photography, and especially close up - floral images suggest female genitalia - later painted skyscrapers to prove she could paint what was typically a male subject Grant Wood, American Gothic: - New York became the central art hub - in the midwest, a group of artists turned back to old styles; American regionalism (regional flavour) - not an actual portrait; idealized view of American pioneers that created America - farmer and his unmarried daughter - hardworking, God fearing original pioneers - Carpenter gothic style house (gothic architecture made of wood); suggests religious belief and medieval outlook - pitchfork = hard work and defence find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com - woman not looking at viewer; standing behind man, who is making eye contact - very close to the frame; intimidation and rigidity Edward Hopper, Nighthawks: - American regionalism even made its way to New York - painted scenes of the unexciting American city - people up late, getting coffee in a diner - they look very bored; woman looks like she’s looking at her nails - only ligh
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