Class Notes (836,844)
Canada (509,924)
History (272)
HIST261 (46)
Lecture

HIST261Confederation1867.pdf

5 Pages
33 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST261
Professor
Margaret Rockwell
Semester
Winter

Description
HIST 261: Confederation            1  Confederation: 1867 January 8th 2014 *Fort Edmonton 1867: British Fort, flying Union Jack (Canada was it’s own country, but not everyone  noticed a difference) British North America Act: passed in London, officially proclaimed on July 1, 1867  ● Dominion: Provinces agreed to united as a federation, a dominion, without changing their  allegiance to the crown.  ● Province of Canada (Canada West and Canada East): became Ontario and Quebec ● Province of Canada united with New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Very good for Province of  Canada and to British crown. ○ creating a country that would deal with local issues (roads, banks, etc.) ○ separated Canada East and West (solving internal issues) ○ Britain wanted to lessen it’s grip on it’s colonies (very expensive) Reasons for Confederation ● The government in the province of Canada wasn’t working, confederation seemed like a good  solution ● maritime provinces were already thinking of joining, Canada asked to come watch the  conference, and took it over to pitch their idea of coalition between Canada and the Maritime ● External Factors:  ○ Era of Nation Building ■ US Civil War (1861 ­1865) ■ Large nations were militarily and economically advantageous ○ British Investors ■ British supported Confederation, wanted colonies to unite, was more focused  on India ■ Investors had invested heavily into the Province of Canada, especially the  railways.  ○ End of British Mercantilism ■ became more interested in Free Trade ■ End of Corn Laws, end of Navigation Acts ■ Signed Free Trade deal with US, 1866: ended because North US believed  Canada and Britain favoured south in Civil War ● Canada began to focus on East West trade.  ○ Britain Supported Confederation ■ wanted Canada to defend itself, was focused on India, wanted less expenses ○ US Civil War (1861­1865) ■ Britain claimed to be neutral, actions suggested they supported confederates.  HIST 261: Confederation            2  ■ US was a military threat to Canada ○ Fenian Threat ■ Irish­Catholics: Fenian brotherhood ■ wanted to liberate Ireland from British Control/wanted to otherthrow Britain ■ couldn’t cross the Atlantic because Britain controlled the seas. Planned to hold  colonies ransom and do a trade.  ■ 1866: raid in New Brunswick ■ Threat of Fenian Raids encouraged confederation (specifically due to the  railway and military aid) ■ Irish­ Protestant: Orange Order Key People George Brown: reform leader of Canada west ● leader of clear grits ● for most of his political life: anti­catholic, anti­french ○ him pushing for coalition was a big step for confederation (After getting married to  Anne, a scottish women, he stopped pressing for British control) John A. Macdonald:  ● leader of conservatives from Canada West George­Etienne Cartier ● leader of bleu in Canada East  Confederation in the provinces of Canada and the Maritimes Coalition aimed to separate provinces so provinces could have autonomy, but have a federal  government.  George Brown, John A. Mcdonald, and George ­ Etienne Cartier attended the conference on maritime  union in 1864 and proposed coalition instead.  ● Canadian observers actually outnumbered martimers ● Convincing the maritimes wasn’t easy: Canada absorbed debt, promise of trade and railways Creating the Constitution ● Charlottetown Conference, September 1864 ● Quebec Conference, October 1864 ○ agreed on 72 resolutions HIST 261: Confederation            3  ○ Federal government was to be responsible for defense, currency, international trade,  transportation, communications, peace, order, and good government (POGG). →  national jurisdiction for national needs ○ left province with autonomy over education, social welfare, property rights, local  matters, (Quebec had control over French rights instead of federal government.)
More Less

Related notes for HIST261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit