Class Notes (838,386)
Canada (510,872)
History (272)
HIST261 (46)
Lecture

HIST261CanadatheMaritimes-1900to1920s.pdf

2 Pages
40 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST261
Professor
Margaret Rockwell
Semester
Winter

Description
HIST 261: Canada & The Maritimes (1920’s)                                                                                1 Canada & Maritimes (1920’s) February 12th 2014  Canada is the 1920’s: In 1919 Prime Minister Robert Borden was the the leader of the Union Party (coalition party:  pro­conscription liberals and the conservatives) ● This had isolated Quebec liberals  Borden led the Canadian delegation in Paris insisted that Canada had their name on the peace treaty as  a separate dominion.  While Borden was away, Wilfrid Laurier passed away. He was recognized as an important figure,  having been in office during the great boom, and in parliament for 45 years (15 of which he was prime  minister). The Liberals would choose William Lyon Mackenzie King as Laurier’s replacement.  Borden returned to growing divisions among Canadian, people expected more from him domestically,  French Canada despised him, Farmers were angry, they felt their concerns were being ignored.  Workers were dissatisfied, felt that there should be more spent on lower classes. Borden resigned in the  summer of 1920. He was replaced by Arthur Meighen. Rapid deflation occurred and production rapidly declined. There 2451 bankruptcies in 1920. Arthur Meighen had strongly supported conscription, so he did not have the support of the French  Canadians, he had also deemed the Winnipeg General Strike as a bolshevik movement, so labour was  also against him. In 1921, Arthur Meighen lost an election, and the coalition party reverted back to the  conservative party. This election destroyed the typical two party system, as the progressives (the  western farmers) won 65 seats, Meighen had 50, and the liberals had all of French Canada’s seats with  a total of 117.  The Maritimes were in decline. The populations were decreasing as people moved west. At the  beginning of the century the Maritime provinces didn’t think of themselves as a region that could have  lobbying power. When they joined confederation, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and PEI each joined  confederation as separate colonies.  ● Their economies were based on trades: fishing, agriculture, later mining.  ● Canada had taken over the debts of the maritimes, as well as the operation of the intercolonial  railway.  In 1900: confederation was credited with allowing economic advancement for the individual provinces, 
More Less

Related notes for HIST261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit