Class Notes (837,435)
Canada (510,273)
LING101 (22)
Lecture

LING101Syntax.pdf

5 Pages
155 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Linguistics
Course
LING101
Professor
Marina Blekher
Semester
Winter

Description
LING 101: Syntax                                                                                                                            1    Syntax  March 25th 2014    The word level categories determine the order of words.  ● Lexical categories ( Nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions)  ● Functional (non­lexical) categories (Determiners, auxiliaries, conjunctions, degree words,  qualifiers)    Paradigm:  set of related forms (based on inflectional affixes)  Verb Paradigm:   ● Base has no suffix (ex. walk)  ● 3rd person singular: ­ s  ● Progressive: ­ing  ● Past: ­ed  ● Past participle:  ­en/­ed  ● Regular and irregular verbs  (some verbs never occur in progressive form)  ● past participles may co­occur with auxiliary verb ‘have’ (= present perfect, past perfect) or the  auxiliary verb ‘be’ (= passive sentences)   Noun Paradigm:  ● Base has no suffix (ex. walk)  ● Plural: ­ s  ● Processive: ­’s  ● Plural Possessive: ­’(s)  ● Regular and irregular (some are singular only, plural only, don’t have a singular/plural contrast)  Pronoun Paradigm:  ● refers to things/individuals without naming them, may substitute for nouns.    Adjectival Paradigm:  LING 101: Syntax                                                                                                                            2  ● Base has no affix  ● Comparative: ­er  ● Superlative: ­est  ● some adjectives use more/most instead of er/est, some are suppletive (ex. bad ­ worse), some  don;t have comparative or superlative forms (ex. subsequent)  Adverbial Paradigm  ● Comparative: ­er  ● Superlative: ­est  ● base has no suffix, Comparative: ­er, Superlative: ­est  ● ­ly is typically   ● adverbs can move around in a sentence.   Prepositions Paradigm:closed set of words  ● denote location in space/time, as well as a number of more abstract relations     ● usually followed by a noun (pronoun), noun phrase (ex. in a box, on monday)    Non­lexical categories   ● Determiners: number, quality, possession, definiteness  ● Auxiliaries: modal verbs (and semi­modals), true auxiliaries   ● Conjunctions: connect words and phrases   ● Degree words: infesity meaning (ex. very)  ● Qualifiers: limit meaning (ex. always, never, almost)    Phrase Structure:    ● each lexical category may be the head of phrase   ● head determines category of phrase   Noun Phrase  ● Minimal: NP → N  ○ Boys smiled  ● The boys smiled. NP → (Det) N  ○ ( ) = optional parts of a phrases  ● The boy at the desk smiled NP → (Det) N (PP*)  ○ PP* shows that there may be more than one  ● Phrase does not need to have a determiner or preposition.   Verb Phrase  ● Intransitive Verbs: verbs that do not take direct objects (NP complements)  ○ I sleep  ● Transitive Verbs: verbs that take direct objects (NP complements)  ○ Jason kicked the ball.  ● ditransitive Verbs: verbs that take direct objects (2 NP complements)  ○ Ben told Jenny the truth  LING 101: Syntax                                                                                                                            3  ● VP → (Qual) V (NP*)  Adjective Phrase  ● General: AP→ (Deg) A (PP)  Prepositional Phrase  ● PP → P  ● Most common: PP → P NP  ● General: PP → (DEG) P (NP)     English Phrase Structure Rules  ● NP → (DET) N (PP*)  ● VP → (Qual) V (NP*)  ● AP→ (Deg) A (PP) 
More Less

Related notes for LING101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit