Class Notes (838,384)
Canada (510,870)
Marketing (91)
MARK301 (48)
Lecture

Mark 301 - Second Month of notes.docx

4 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Marketing
Course
MARK301
Professor
Jennifer Argo
Semester
Winter

Description
February – Marketing (after midterm which was chapter 1­6) Feb 13 Segmenting, Targeting and Positioning ­Designing a marketing strategy  ­Why are there so many varieties of products in stores of basically the same thing – so many  choices for same product categories ­Malcolm Gladwell video – segmenting market horizontally, importance of having variety  because of the diversity of consumers, they want to be satisfied by choices, Howard rethought  how to make people happy, no better or worse in terms of taste and preference, what industry  thinks is best may not be what consumers want ­Segmentation and Targeting – whom ­Segmentation breaks market into clusters, Targeting decides which segments you can choose to  enter ­Then can position your product in your target markets mind (perception very important) ­way to get a position is by differentiating your product from others Segmentation – Dividing the total market into smaller, distinct, relatively homogenous groups  who respond similarly to marketing strategies ­no single marketing mix can satisfy everyone ­use separate marketing mixes for different segments ­need to break market down because impossible to satisfy everyone (embrace diversity) ­can segment geographic, demographic, psychographic, behavioural/product usage ­Geographic segmentation – by location (regional) or environment (climate), does not ensure all  consumers in a location make the same buying decision, useful for general patterns ­Demographic segmentation – dividing groups according to personal characteristics (gender  quite clear, whereas income and age not so clear), easy to measure so most popular ­Psychographic segmentation – looks at attitudes, tastes, behaviours, personality and lifestyles,  very effective, use large­scale survey, lifestyle – peoples decisions about how to live their daily  lives, including family, job, social…, VALS (Values and Lifestyles) survey divides people into  eight segments that differ on primary motivation (why they are buying things: Ideals,  Achievement or Self­expression), their resources (tendency to consume goods or services: High  or Low, depends on demographics and psychogrpahics), and willingness to be innovative  ­Behavioural Segmentation – dividing based on their knowledge, attitude, use or response to a  product (purchase occasion, benefits, user status, usage rates for a product, loyalty), ex: company  have loyalty programs, target this small market who make most of the purchases ­Can combine different segmentation strategies to reach the right markets to increase accuracy ­Segmentation criteria: measurable, accessible, substantial, differentiable, actionable ▯ ot all segments are good markets to go after, develop a profile for each segment, evaluate each  in terms of size and growth rate, attractiveness (competitive market), company objectives and  resources (takes a lot of money to target groups so need enough resources and know you really  understand the target market you are trying to pursue, don’t want conflict with current customers  and new ones you’re trying to market ­Selecting targets: Undifferentiated/mass marketing (ex: sugar, not a lot of options, for  commodity, consistent product, hard to differentiate the product)▯differentiated marketing (ex:  recognize different groups, laundry detergents with different brands)▯concentrated/niche  marketing (segment market and pick a smaller segment that has something unique about  it)▯micromarketing (ex: Amazon can suggest things to you based on your previous purchases, or  anything you can customize) ­Mass marketing – 4 Ps the same for everyone, get as much of the whole market as possible with  one market offering, use when common needs and economies of scales are important Feb 15 ­Selecting targets – which segments you want to go after, can use combination of segments ­Differentiated – notice that people have different needs, try to satisfy different needs with  different brands for diff. concerns ­concentrated/niche – go after one particular segment, there is something special about them and  really try to understand them in a lot of depth, ex: Zappos only have 2% market but have a lot of  shoes for their customers ­Micromarketing – two ways: focus on individual consumer level preferences (ex: make your  own/customize product like build a bear), other way is by looking at geography (offer slightly  different products in one place compared to other places, broader than indivdual) ­Segmenting (company perspective) vs. Positioning (consumer perspective, hard to understand) –  segmentation is firms view of the consumer, leads firms to select customers to target, positioning  creates/influences consumers perspective of firm and its products (PERCEPTION of how  consumers process info) ­for positioning: how do you differentiate yourself, choose diff. to focus on, decide how to  position your product, Positioning – way the product is defined by consumers on important  attributes, can be differentiated in many ways vs. competitors, product attributes, branding ­differentiation alone not enough – consumers must understand, must be important and  communicable and easy to remember (fewer words to convey your message), sometimes  differentiation of price can be enough st st ­1  Mover stvantage – i
More Less

Related notes for MARK301

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit