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PAC131 (7)
Judy Liao (7)
Lecture

Jan 9 - CS4L Badminton.doc

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Department
Physical Activity
Course
PAC131
Professor
Judy Liao
Semester
Winter

Description
Jan 9 – CS4L Badminton Canadian Sport For Life (CS4L) and Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) CS4L 1.) An initiatives of sport Canada 2.) … LTAD 1.) In juncture with CS4L 2.) … 3.) … Ten Key Factors of LTAD 1.) The 10 year rule: For one to achieve their max athletic potentials, it requires 10,000 hours over 10 years of trainings 2.) FUNdamentals: develop physical literacy before sport specific movements 3.) Specialization: Early and late specialization of sport. LTAD allows different sport start times. If we train kids too early, they may burnout and leave sport altogether. 4.) Developmental age: degree of participants physical, mental, cognitive, and emotional maturity 5.) Trainability: responsiveness of developing individuals to the training stimulus at different stages of growth and maturation. 5 S’s impact on trainability: stamina, strength, speed, skill, and suppleness (flexibility) 6.) Physical, mental, cognitive and emotional development: a holistic approach that can accommodate different participants 7.) Periodization: Time management: arrange training process into a logical schedule to bring about optimal improvements 8.) Calendar planning for competition: competition/Practice ratio. When we are learning the game the CP ratio should be low. 9.) System alignment and integration: Use LTAD as the core concept to align operations of sport organizations in all levels and for all purposes (elite, community, school, recreation) 10.) Continuous improvement: The Eight Stage Guide 1.) Active Start: people who just gain mobility. Ex. Just to get A baby moving or someone coming back from injury 2.) FUNdamentals (Fundamentals 1): development of physical literacy 3.) Learning to Train (Fundamentals 2) – only ages 10-12. When we translate physical literacy to a specific sports field 4.) Training to Train (“Building the Engine”): they have fundamentals and you start to teach about the game. We put the athletes into slightly more competitive situations. 5.) Training to Compete (“Challenge of Competition”): focus on how you can combine strategy and skill in a game situation 6.) Learning to Win (“Consistent Performance”) 7.) Training to Win (“Performing when it counts”) 8.) Retainment/Active for Life (“Dealing with Adversity”) Print slide 7
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