Class Notes (835,600)
Canada (509,275)
Psychology (1,170)
PSYCO241 (117)
Lecture

reserch and method.docx

4 Pages
71 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO241
Professor
Erik Faucher
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 1: Jan 9 Research and method. Gathering Information and Theories • Empiricism: Basing knowledge on observations • A theory is a summary statement, a general principle, or set of principles about a class of  events. It Can be very specific or very broad (or anywhere in between).  ( it is basically Based  on observations which can lead to set of principles about a class of events. Throughout  history, men can be seen from bones to have more physical combat judging from the health  of their bones. Boys who play with violent) • Theories seek to  explain 1)  some          phenomena ,          wn              and  based          on      e    t     2) Predict new information (Should be able to predict related events. Like  skeleton example. Perhaps men were also doing more physical labor like hunting, taking  down predators etc. It is somewhat related to the subject at hand) Evaluating Theories •  How do we evaluate a theory?   – A THEORY should be testable  – Should generate hypotheses: which are Predictions about specific events that are  derived from one or more theories.   (Sometime conditions need to be revised to support the hypothesis. You can tweak and  tweak till it supports your hypothesis or predictions by changing you hypothesis. A  good theory should always have like 3­4 hypotheses to go with it) • Breadth of information behind the theory – Basing a theory on one source of information weaken the theory • Parsimony: Include as few assumptions as possible. – Can keep a theory simpler and more organized.  (Prefer the theory that has the least  amount of assumptions. Two machines. Both do the same task at hand and equally as  well.The machine with the fewer moving parts, has a smaller chance of one of those  parts breaking down on you). Parsimony is controversial. This is because human  beings are complex and not simple. All our behaviour has many explanations. Some  theories need to be more complicated than we  li   k  e  Variables and measuring variable • What is a variable?  –   Something that varies. Dimensions along which variations exist.  – Must vary for at least two values. • Nominal or Categorical Variables :(e.g., gender) M or F ( one or the other. Cannot have two  values) • Continuous Variables: Makes use of real numbers designating amounts to reflect relative  differences in magnitude. Scores reflected on a continuum.  (e.g., self­esteem) Jon has higher  self­esteem than Chris because Jon’s score is 5.3 and Chris’s score is 3.7.  Measuring variables: • Observer ratings: An assessment in which someone else produces information about the  person being assessed. Assessment and measurement usually mean the same • Self­report: An assessment in which people make ratings pertaining to themselves (e.g., how  one feels).  • Example (Going straight to the source.  Asking them/ hoping it’s the truth) – “I find it hard to approach members of the opposite sex.”  (T/F) (1 or the other. Forced  choice, one or the other (nominal value) – “I would prefer a potential partner with earning potential.” ( diff magnitude) Lecture 1: Jan 9 Research and method. o (Agree) 1 2   3   4   5   6    7 (strongly disagree) – “Please briefly describe the emotions that the thought of your partner confiding secrets in  someone else arouses in you ( this  is an open minded question so the response can very a lot) Establishing Relationships among Variables • To establish a relationship must study at least two levels of the variable we’re interested in.  • Do individuals who are more optimistic about a test perform better? – Need to know how individuals who are optimistic perform on the test, as well as  individuals who are pessimistic.  – (Its good to have confidence. We need something to compare to. Hence why the two  levels so we can establish relationship between these variables)  The Correlation • A relationship in which two variables or dimensions convary when measured repeatedly • Two distinct aspects of a correlation – The direction: can be positive and negative – The strength of the correlation • Examples: Does the amount of extraversion correlate with the number of friends a person has  on facebook?  • Variable #1: Level of extraversion ( • Variable #2: Amount of friends facebook  • Results: If the correlation is negative, since as extraversion increase, the number of friend  increase (there is an inverse relationship). If the correlation is positive, then extraversion   increase, friend increase as well. Strength of a Correlation • The strength of a correlation refers to how closely associated the two variables are.  • Represented with a correlation coefficient( R) that ranges from 0­1 • Positive correlations have positive number and negative correlations have a negative number  (Sign indicates the direction) • r = ­0.9 is just as strong and +0.9. the signs only dictate the direction. Correlation is NOT Causation • A correlation does NOT demonstrate causality, which is the relationship between a cause and  an effect ((Can imply cause and effect but never guarantee it) • Susceptible to reverse causality  – Not being able to  ((distinguish which variable is causing the other variable).  For  example: in the above study, it could be just that people a narcist and they think  they are better then every one else or it could be that they have a lot of statuses #  that cause them to extraverted. • Correlations are susceptible to the  3     variable proble .vThe possibility that an unmeasured  variable caused variations in both of two correlated variables. • Confound: additional variable, or a nuisance variable, that may influence our dependent  variable or varies systematically with our independent or predictor variable. Establishing Causality 3 essential factors that establish causality 1. Covariation: Need to observe that changes in one variable correspond to  changes in another variable Lecture 1: Jan 9 Research and method.
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO241

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit