Class Notes (835,798)
Canada (509,410)
Psychology (1,170)
PSYCO341 (16)
Lecture

chapter 10 multicultural.docx

6 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 10(1): Living in Multicultural Worlds Heritage Culture vs. Host Culture Longitudinal study: very difficult as takes a long time and hard to do. Cross sectional studies: easy since those that are born on outside their culture and those live in same culture  compared. Problem is that there are so many confounding variables so it is very hard to control. What Happens When People Move to a New Culture? • There are many reasons why people go to another culture. Once  they are in their, they might live n different environments. • Moving to a new culture involves psychological adjustment=the  stress level is high.  • One common pattern of acculturation is captured by a U­shaped  curve. • Y=positive how the participants like the new culture and  X=times  • First few month▯very excited▯called the  HONEYMOON phase • As the time passes▯a dip seen▯cultural shock (6­18 month being sick, and tired of the new country). They  may find to hard to communicate with new culture people and are overwhelmed. Some of them can’t go  through this go back while others stay. CRISIS or CULTURAL SHOCK period. • As you stay long▯they start enjoying the experience again. Language mastered now. Develop friendship as a   results etc.  ADJUSTMENT PHASE. • They can reverse this and receive cultural shock if they now after spending long time in America and then  decide to go back. Homogenous Culture vs. Multiculturalism • In more homogenous cultures the adjustment phase of the curve is sometimes not experienced.  For  example, one study of immigrants to Japan showed an L­shaped curve, where people who had lived in  Japan for more than 5 years weren’t faring much better than those who were in the depths of culture shock  after one year (Hsiao­Ying, 1995). Who Adjusts Better? • Cultural Distance ­ How similar is their heritage culture to the host culture.( Same culture, it is ok and you  adjust better) • A parallel phenomenon exists for learning another language.   • Languages can be categorized by how recently they shared a common linguistic ancestor.  Those, which  have a more recent common linguistic ancestor, are more similar in terms of their grammar and  morphology. Thus it might be easier for them to get this language rather then completely different. • When you look around the world, their are chunk of language spread throughout the world. • Similarity in language can help you adjust better. TOEFL score showed that Germany and Sweden has the  highest score. Perhaps because English is very similar to language in these culture (Indo­Europeans are a  lot better). Japanese is the lowest. Similar Culture, Good Adaptation • Verb is at the end of the sentence for Japanese I you love NOT (verb at the end). I you LOVE (will be on  exam) • The more similar one’s heritage culture is to one’s host culture, the easier it is to adapt to the host culture.  • Sojourners who have greater cultural distance from the host culture tend to show more distress, have more  medical consultations, and have more difficulty in making friendships with people from the host culture. • Study: Malaysian exchange students who went to study in culturally­similar Singapore showed more  successful sociocultural adjustment than those who went to study in more culturally distant New­Zealand. First Nations in Canada • The tsimshian of the Northwest BC coast traditionally relied largely on subsistence practices (mostly  fishing) that allowed them to accumulate large quantities of food and establish permanent highly stratified  settlements. • The eastern cree from Northern Quebec were migratory, did not accumulate many resources, and had little  stratification (hunter and gather) • The carrier, of Northeastern BC was intermediate in terms of their resource accumulation, and social  stratification.  • Paralleling the cultural similarities with colonial culture, the tsimshian acculturated to mainstream Canadian  culture with the least acculturative stress, the eastern Cree showed the most difficulties, and carrier were  intermediate. • Thus cultural difference btw first nations and the colonial culture determine who are better able to adapt to  it. Acculturation and Personality • Research has found that extraverted Finns from rural Finland are more likely to move to urban parts of  Finland, than are less extraverted rural Finns.  Apparently, people with a preference for social engagement  enjoy the diverse social opportunities in urban regions (Jokela et al., 2008). • ANIMAL RESEARCH: Curiously, a similar pattern has been identified with lizards.  Those lizards with  high “social tolerance” are more likely to move to densely populated patches than low in social tolerance. • Extraversion does not universally predict acculturation success.   • However, what appears to be more important is whether the individual’s personality matches with that of  the dominant host culture • Extraverts fare well in a largely extraverted culture, such as the US, but extraverts have more problems  fitting in in less extraverted cultures, such as Singapore. • Likewise, Asians with more independent self­concepts have an easier time acculturating to North America  vs. those that are more collectivist.  Acculturation Strategies • People vary in the acculturation strategies that they use.   • The two key variables are how positive are people attitude  towards their host culture, and how positive are attitudes  towards their heritage culture There are 4 possible strategies  that can be arranged in a 2 by 2 table. • The table on the right will be on exam. Acculturation Strategies (con’t) • The most common strategy that people pursue is the integrations strategy.   • The marginalization strategy is the least common strategy (very negative attitudes associated with it) • Assimilation and separation are intermediate in frequency. • The assimilation strategy is associated with more positive outcomes than the separation strategy.  •  Separation  bears the cost of rejecting the host culture ( reject Canadianàyour children also do this) A Salad Bowl or a Melting Pot? • Societies also vary in terms of the model of multiculturalism that they pursue. • Some countries, such as Canada, strive for a “salad bowl” model, where each ethnic group maintains its  distinctive characteristics, and adds unique flavor to the whole. • Other countries, such as The USA, strive more for a “melting pot” model, where each ethnic group’s  distinctive characteristics are melted away as they learn to assimilate to the dominant culture. • What do you see as some of the strengths and weaknesses of these two models? (we are all Americans but  then original culture values is lost. People can be proud at the expense of group solidary but they also try to  fit in if it values diversity▯and more positive attitudes as a result) Need for Cognitive Closure (NCC) • They completed a “Need for Cognitive Closure” scale.  This scale assesses people’s comfort with  uncertainty.  Those with a high need for cognition are uncomfortable with uncertainty, and will seek firm  answers, even if such answers might not really exist.  • It’s all about trying to make everything clear. If you are in Italy if you are high in need of this, i..e things are  very unclear, you are more likely to take assimilation strategy since they really hate the uncertainty. • Study: Croatian immigrants to Italians. • They indicated whom they primarily associated with during their first 3 months in Italy. • They completed a measure of sociocultural adaptation, which indicated how successfully they had adapted  to life in Italy. Effect of initial interactions: • For participants low in a need for cognitive closure, their early experiences had little impact on their  subsequent adaptation. • In contrast, for those high in a need for cognitive closure, their early experiences had much impact on their  adaptation.   Chapter 10 (2):  70% after midterms only notes and you will get 85% Positive Outcomes of Multiculturalism Being Multicultural • Moving to a new culture requires psychological adaptation.  In the process of adapting to a new culture, one  needs to begin to see things in a new way. • There can be some particular benefits to learning how to see things differently.  Do Multicultural Experiences Foster Creativity? • A key part of creativity is insight ­ where you see a problem in a novel way. • Creative insight might be fostered by adjusting to a new cultural environment, where you learn to see things  in a different way.  If you are used to looking at life from more than one perspective, you might be more  likely to have creative insights. • Many famous artists and writers had multicultural experiences. • Richard wright wrote: “Once I went (abroad) it was extremely exciting for me to become a new personality,  to be detached from everything that bound me, noticing everything that was different.  That noticing of  difference was very important.” The candle example: • How could you attach the candle to the wall so that it burns properly (vertically), and doesn’t get wax on  the floor, using only these objects? Hammer the box into the wall and then light the candle and then using a  drop of wax to stick it to the wall. If you can’t think of the box as a holder of candle ▯ no answer will be  find. The Creativity Test, Results •  Time spent living abroad  predicted creativity •  Merely traveling abroa  d, as a tourist, in contrast, did not improve performance. • One alternative explanation to this is that it might be that creative people are more likely to live abroad.   That is, according to this account, it’s not that adapting to new cultures makes one more creative, but  having a creati
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit