Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Psychology (1,170)
PSYCO341 (16)
Lecture

Culture and Cognition Chapter 11.docx

4 Pages
110 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Culture and Cognition Chapter 11: Mental Health Culture­Bound Syndromes • Some psychopathologies are far more prevalent, or manifest in highly different forms across cultures  • dhat syndrome ­ men from some parts of South Asia become morbidly anxious that they are losing semen. • The symptoms that are identified for the disorders typically were done in Western samples, and it’s not  always clear whether Western cultural beliefs are bound to the disorders. (DSM 4 now is beginning to  incorporate some cultural bound syndromes but still a lot are missing) Hikikomori (social withdrawal) • Commonly afflicts male (3x more than females) adolescents. • Doesn’t map on to any diagnoses in the DSM­IV ( non­existence in pre­war and other countries) • Typical response is to drop out from the social world, often barricading oneself up in a room for years, and  not interacting with anyone, except perhaps to make requests/demands to one’s parents. • Reason: Perhaps extreme pressure from school. If they drop out it is hard to catch up and thus a lot of  disappointment. Other believes that interdependent society; if you are NOT part of the community you  might feel really bad. Even the exams and the ability to get into school is even more stress. Anorexia/Bulimia Nervosa  • Anorexia involves symptoms where a person refuses to maintain a normal body weight because of a  preoccupation with their body. • Bulimia involves symptoms where one uncontrollably binge eats, and then subsequently takes  inappropriate measures to prevent weight gain (i.e. vomit everything after eating) • Both: somewhat present in other cultures BUT predominantly found in the west.  • Saints were highly motivated to engage in such voluntary starving because of their ascetic lifestyles. So,  such a behavior is called “Holy Anorexia.” • In contrast, the main cause of anorexia common in contemporary Western societies relates to body image  (specially started to increase in 1970’s and 1980’s in Western societies) •  Thus meaning system associated with both are different. Koro • Men develop morbid anxiety that their penis is shrinking into their body (or, far less commonly, women  fear their nipples are shrinking).  • This occurs primarily in South and East Asia, especially Southern China and Malaysia.  Amok • Most common in Southeast Asia. • A condition where there is an acute outburst of unrestrained violent and homicidal attacks, preceded by  brooding, and followed by exhaustion and amnesia • May be the result of not having culturally acceptable means to express frustrations. •   Could have parallels with Western mass homicidal attacks. Frigophobia • It is found largely in China. A morbid fear of catching cold. • People will avoid cold air, eating cold food, and dress with several layers, even in summer. Pibloktoq­Arctic Hysteria • A unique hysterical attack observed among Arctic Inuit communities, particularly among women. • People suddenly tear off their clothes, roll in the snow, and convulse, with no clear precipitating factors. Other Cultural­bound Syndromes:Culture­bound syndromes dramatically reveal the cultural basis of some  psychopathologies. • Hwa­Byung (Korea):   Ghost Sickness (Native Americans): psychotic disorder. General weakness, loss of appetite, and feeling of  terror. Illusion that they can’t breath and are breath alive. • Windigo (Native Americans): fear of being eaten by this monster. • Qi­Gong Psychotic Reaction (China): special bleeding techniques that are often dillusion • Zar (Ethiopia): loss of function of the autonomic nervous system ( cry laught without any reason) • Susto­Soul Loss (South America): people feel that their soul is dislodged from their body • Mal De Ojo­Evil Eye (Mediterranean Culture): insomnia. Vomiting, diarhehia without any causes. • Channeling (All Over the World) Universal Syndromes: But we still have some variation in them though Depression • Depression is probably the most familiar psychopathology, and it is found all over the world. • General Symptoms: You have to have 5/9 and at least for MORE THEN 2 weeks – a) depressed mood – b) an inability to feel pleasure – c) change in weight or appetite – d) sleep problems – e) psychomotor change – f) fatigue or loss of energy – g) feelings of worthlessness or guilt – h) poor concentration or indecisiveness – i) suicidality (suicide) Depression and Culture • Depression is found everywhere, however rates of depression vary across cultures. • In particular, much research has identified how depression rates in China are only about 1/5 that observed  in the West. • However, a challenge in comparing rates of depression across cultures arises because the presentation of  depression also appears to vary. • Somatization­Physiological Symptoms ( no energy, fatiques, sleep problem etc) • Psychologization­Psychological Symptoms (guilt, worthless, etc) Somitization vs. Psychologization • Arthur Kleinman, an anthropologist and psychiatrist, conducted extensive interviews with Chinese  neurasthenia patients and concluded that a majority (87%) could be diagnosed as having depression, even  though only 9% of them reported depressed mood as a chief complaint.   • That is, he argued that depression manifests itself among Chinese chiefly through somatization rather than  psychologization (say they ok but when you observe them they have headache, pain etc) • Thus manifestation of depression are different. Causes of Cultural Variation in Depressive Symptoms • Why do these different presentations of depression exist? • (1) Chinese people with depression are worried about the public stigma of having a mental disorder, and  thus conceal it with somatic symptom reporting. (do not report it openly) • (2) Westerners are more attentive than the Chinese to their emotional states.  Western psychological  symptoms might thus be more accessible to them than they are for Chinese. • One recent study investigated this question by comparing psychiatric outpatients in China and Canada  (Ryder et al., 2008). Procedure: • All patients had to report at least one of the nine diagnostic markers of depression.  Patients reporting any  kind of psychotic symptoms were excluded. • Patients’ symptoms were assessed with three different methods. •  A spontaneous problem report , where they described their concerns with little prompting from the  interviewer. •  A standard clinical interview , in which the patients responded to specific questions about symptoms  from an interviewer. •  A standard questionaire , which was completed in private, in which patients gave answers to specific  symptom questions. • Patients also completed measures of stigma and attention to emotional states ( how much pay attn?) • Results: Chinese expressed greater somatic except the private questionnaire. Canadians e
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit