Class Notes (834,149)
Canada (508,378)
Psychology (1,168)
PSYCO341 (16)
Lecture

chapter 6(1).docx

4 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 6(1): Self and Personality Self­concept How we perceive ourselves, and understand our identity plays a crucial role in how we  think about many things.   The self­concept is implicated in directing what information  we should attend to, it shapes the kinds of meaning that we draw from events, it  influences the kinds of relationships that we have, it affects our emotions, and it  influences what we will be motivated to work towards.  It is central to our psychology. Independent vs. Interdependent Views of Self Reserachers: Seminal paper by Markus and Kitayama (1991) They argued that much of what is known in social psychology has been studied with  people who share a primarily distinct view of self ­ an independent self (usually  westerners). In much of the non­Western world, in contrast, an interdependent self is  more common. If the view of self differs from culture to culture should the psychology  also differ? These researchers argued that this is the case. Independent View of Self • Identity is experienced as largely independent from others. • Important aspects of identity are personal characteristics (that everyone has their  own unique attributes and are distinct.) • Identity remains largely constant across roles and situations. • Considerable fluidity between in­groups and out­groups. The diagram:  Circle around the individual (yellow), does not overlap anyone and is independent from  other. This mean that their identity is shaped based on internal characteristic (the X).  The aspects of identity or the kind of feature that people thing of them are within the  Individual independent from others. The borderline around induidual is a solid line, it indicates that self is bounded and  experiences a rather stable and does not change from situation to situation The boundary btw in­group and out­group (is dashed) is not important but rather the  most important boundary is the boundary around the individual ( yellow) Thus their view of self often arises from oneself alone. This view is dominant in the  western society. Interdepended view of self • Individual’s identity is importantly interdependent with others. • Key aspects of identity include roles, relationship, and memberships As roles  change across situations, identity is also somewhat fluid across situations. • Clear distinction between in­groups and out­groups. Comments: Usually Asian ( south, north, etc). Self is a relational antity that is made up  of interaction with members of the significant others. Mentally, the self is connected to  others (participant of the large social units). Main idea is that you are part of the society Diagram:  Border around self: overlaps with Indi duals who the person is in relation with. They are  connected it others and thus are NOT distinct unique identities. Chapter 6(1): Self and Personality  The large X’s:    rest at the interaction of other this indicates that identity is grounded in  relationship to others.  There are some axes that are not connected to others but that’s not  so important. The doted line around individual yellow: reflect that identity of the interdepended of  the self is fluid and changeable it depends on the situation and roles. Solid line around in­group and out­group: distinction btw in­group members and the  out­group. The relationship with significant other is very close and very hard to get away  from in­group to out­group. Out groups is not important relationship. Independent vs. interdependent lifestyles: differ a lot (sleeping arrangements) Study: Chines immigrant in Edmonton vs. Europeans in Sherwood park vs. Chinese in  china 90% European: solitary sleeping, 99% in Chinese with parent sleeping 80% first generation still exercise they indorse the traditional ways of child bearing. Self Representation & Culture Question: Do East Asians really merge others (and Others’ view) into their self­ representation?  Author: A Neuro­Imaging Study by Zhu, Zhang, Fan, & Han  (2007). Participants:  (Chinese & Americans) were presented with a variety of personality traits,  and asked to judge how much each trait was applicable to them.  Results: For Chinese, MPFC (related to the self representation) were activated when the  word “self and my mother” were presented. For Americans, MPFC was activated only  when the word “self” appeared. Mental differentiation was activated only if you got the  information about you (self) but it depended on what you define self as (self=me and my  parent in Asian vs Self=me only in USA) Variety Facets of Interdependent vs. Independent Self Construals Cognition study involves: Self­Description, Self­Awareness, Self­Consistency Self­Description People are asked to describe themselves with a number of statements that begin with “I  am _____’? The kinds of statements that they list are then counted and analyzed. People  from some different cultural groups often provide different kinds of statements. In one  study, participants were asked to complete twenty of these The Results of Ma & Schoeneman, (1997) Personal Characteristics were dominant responses among American Undergrad Students  (independent self). In Urban Kenyans’ responses were similar to these of American  Undergrad Students (they are western influenced).  Roles of memberships were dominant responses among tribal 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit