Class Notes (836,658)
Canada (509,870)
POLI 201 (58)
Lecture

POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES II PART 2.docx

7 Pages
57 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 201
Professor
Jay Makarenko
Semester
Fall

Description
POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES II October 15 TUE LECT: Socialism THURS LEC: Feminism 1. Socialism in Practice and Theory 2. Types of Socialism 3. Socialism v. Reform Liberalism 4. Socialism and Government    SOCIALISM AND MODERN POLITICS ­Socialist thought develops in response to the rise of liberalism and free market capitalism  Socialism and World Politics: ­Rise of Communism and the cold War ­Rise of Social Democracy in Europe Socialism in Canada: ­Political parties: New Democratic Party ­Rise of the social­welfare state (e.g. Public healthcare)  SOCIALISM AS A SOCIAL THEORY ­Social Theory and Explanation: Develops approaches to explaining and predicting  political events and outcomes. Scientific Socialism: ­Structures: the primary unit of analysis are broad structures that frame politics (e.g. modes of  production and class relations) ­Determines: politics is the inevitable consequences of these broader economic forces: Political  outcomes (i.e. tax policy. Welfare state, etc.) is direct tied to the demands and needs of  capitalism. ­Economic elites tend to dominate public policy process ­Economic norms and needs f capitalism tend to dominate public policy  process  SOCIALISM AS NORMATIVE THEORY ­In addition to being a social theory (what is and wil be), socialism is also a normative theory (what  ought to be) Key Normative Ideas: ­Criticism of liberal freedom (particularly economic life) ­Advocates substantive economic equality CONSERVATIVES AND LIBERAL FREEDOM  ­Paternalism: Many are irrational and bad choosers. Need to be ruled over their own good. ­Community: Need to protect the collective and its traditional norms and practices. Political implications: ­Not necessarily based solely on legal authority and voluntary respect for the rules that govern the  exercise of power. ­May also be based on respect for the source of the command. SOCIALISM AND EQUALITY Claim #1: The emphasis on individual freedom leads to exploitation, domination, and suffering Claim #2: Emphasis should be, instead, on equality for all in society and distribution based on  need. Claim #3: This emphasis on equality often requires society and/or the state to interfere in  persons’ liberties  Key Concepts: collectivism and substantive equality.  ASSUMPTION #1: COLLECTIVISM ­SOCIALISTS TEND TO REJECT THE LIBERAL IDEA THAT INDIVIDUALS ARE THE BASIC  UNITS IN POLITICAL SOCIETY (EACH WITH THEIR OWN UNIQUE SET OF INTERESTS  AND ENDS).  Socialism and Economic Collectivism ­Basic units are groups based on particular social or economic groups. ­Human beings are defined by the economic class (rich­poor; workers­owners.) ­Political society is often defined by the relations and conflict between these basic economic  classes. NOTE: collectivism varies from one form of socialism to another (social democracy theory more  open to individual pluralism than Marxist communist theory).   ASSUMPTION #2: SUBSTANTIVE EQUALITY Liberalism and Formal Equality:  ­Formal Equality: all are equal in the sense that we all posses the same basic rights (vote, speech,  legal, etc.) ­However, liberalism permits great inequality outside of this formal sense (wealth, power, status,  etc.) Socialism and Substantive Equality: ­Socialism advocates a more substantive notion of equality , in which persons are to be equal not  only formally, but also in their economic conditions and relations SOCIALISM AND FORMS OF EQUALITY Distribution of Goods: ­Distribution of key economic goods (income, wealth, basic social services) should be equal or  based upon need (as opposed to ability to pay). ­Implication: measure of control over how these economic goods are distributed and/or  red
More Less

Related notes for POLI 201

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit