Class Notes (834,986)
Canada (508,846)
Sociology (514)
SOCI 325 (82)
All (16)
Lecture

Notes on Functionalism

5 Pages
33 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 325
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
People are moral to the extent that they are social. –Durkheim Functions of Crime: There are four ways in which deviance contributes to the normative order: It sets boundaries It enhances group solidarity It maintains innovative functions It reduces tensions “Latent (not known in advance­these 4 are latent) vs. Manifest (punish to  show others its wrong)” Problems of Functionalism: False Teleology Tautology No theory of crime/ deviance Non­ disprovable  Beneficial  False Teleology: This is “the imputation of cause to beneficial consequence” Or “the explanation of phenomena by the purpose they serve rather than by postulated causes” Tautology: Circular reasoning. “because if it exists it must be functional. If it were not functional it would not  exist” Prostitution (Davis) would not exist if it were not functional Crime, poverty, repressive governments, deviance, etc Kai Erickson (1964)­ Wayward Puritans: Erikson used court records to reconstruct the role of deviance among Puritans of the  Massachusetts Bay Colony. He found: for each punishment moral boundaries were clarified each time the community moves to censure deviance, it sharpens the authority of the violated  norm. The norm is more clearly identified as important to society. Erikson 2: The definitions of deviance were clarified by the values of society  Norms varied with what is punished Men who fear witches soon find themselves surrounded by them; men who become jealous of  private property soon encounter wager thieves. Erikson 3:  Most importantly, he notes that the volume of deviants remained relatively constant over a 30 year  period “does the fear of deviance create deviance, or does deviance create fear? In out post 9/11 society, will we find more acts of terrorism suggesting a greater problem than what  actually exists? Prostitution (Kingsley Davis): In 1937, Davis asked “why is it that a practice so thoroughly disapproved, so widely outlawed in  Western Civilization, can yet flourish so universally? Why is it considered “the world’s oldest profession?” He argued that prostitution would never be eliminated because of the important social functions it  served Prostitution 2: Prostitution exists for physiological and sociological reasons Physiological Davis noted that females do not have periods of anoestrus (complete unresponsiveness to sexual  stimuli). Different from other mammals because it is conditioned (sexual stimuli) Sociological Social dominance. The degree of dominance determines how bodily appetites will be satisfied Prostitution 3: Davis wrote: Since prostitution is a contractual relation (money for sex), it is strange that  modern writers have mad
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 325

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit