Class Notes (835,116)
Canada (508,936)
Geography (623)
GEOG 3050 (33)
Lecture 4

GEOG Lecture 4 January 29.docx

5 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GEOG 3050
Professor
Roberta Hawkins
Semester
Winter

Description
GEOG Lecture 4  January 29, 2014 Housing: diversity in cities in the global south “slum housing” Urban Inequality: the growing practice of “slum tourism” ­ ethical concerns : exploitation ▯ financial  ▯the people who show the tours of the  communities etc may not be the people actually living there, were encouraging  people to be poor, social distancing. Representation  ▯tourists want to see  authentic poverty and they expect to see certain things.  ­ Benefits  ▯tourism of this is because poverty has become a central issue,  collaborative planning ­ Can tourists actually make a distance? Not jus the money but the increased  awareness by inviting them into these communities because they experience the  poverty and it makes them want to take action.  Example: you can go on a fake slum experience  Slum housing:  ­ almost 1 billion people live in slum areas in the global south ­ informal settlements, squatter settlements, favelas, villas, miserias, gecekondu,  bustees, bidonvilles  ▯not holistic terms  ­ Millennium Development Goal addressing slums  ▯by 2020 achieve improvement  in lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers  ▯tricky to define and to measure ­ The proportion of slum dwellers have gone down and there have been  improvements BUT because of the population growth and migration, the actual  number of people living in these places has gone up Definitions:  Households that lack either improved water, improved sanitation, sufficient living areas  (more than 3 people per room) and durable housing  What about social dimensions? Schools, hospitals, banks? If it doesn’t have these things  it should still be considered low quality. “slums of hope” ▯ quality is improving, integration and sense of development improving­  makes it seem like less of a problem vs “slums of despair” d ▯ eclining neighborhoods,  degeneration, things are bad and theyre getting worse, not absolute definitions, but it’s the  context of the community, is it headed downward? Hard to measure.  Davis 2006:  Regional overviews, most extreme slums  Data limitations  ▯1980s 5% poverty rate in Bangkok but 25% were considered slum  dwellers mismatch.  Why do people live in slums? Theyre trying to optimize housing cost, tenure and security,  quality of shelter, journey to work, and sometimes­personal safety. Trade offs, they have  to take all of these things into consideration.  De facto tenure; de facto authority figures  Slum typologies: context specific.  Locations within urban environments  ­ urban periphery (edge of the town)  ▯mega cities, new land uses have to happen  on the edge because the entire middle is already taken up. About 2/3 of slums are  of this type ­ inner­city slum ▯  pieces of land not developed yet, or abandoned factories etc is  about 1/3 of slums  ­ unoccupied peri­urban tracts of land ­ publically owned land *** somewhat a political statement  ­ unoccupied marginal land in the city core  ▯train tracks, highways, river banks Low income mirco­apartments in apartment basements and air raid tunnels  ▯little access  to sanitation, small rooms, no windows, no decorations.  Living in well designed building basemengts etc, engineered to be of good quality and  able to withstand disasters etc.  Gulyani and Bassett 2010: Diversity within slums how do we make comparisons? ­ idea of a living conditions diamond c ▯ onsists of 4 criteria: infrastructure, the unit  itself, neighborhood and the tenure.  ­ On each metric they see how the space meets the criteria and the larger the shaded  area within the better the housing is.  Conditions:  ­ physical conditions  ▯deteriorated, patchwork urban forma unplanned, unaesthetic  where theyre built in poor places, hazardous locations, poor infrastructure,  environmental issues  ▯can be due to placement, or lack of infrastructure.  ­ Social problems: overcrowding (space per person), diseases connected to density  and environment, crime and vice (prostitution, gambling etc  ▯only sometimes),  political dissent (people have a bone to pick with the government  ▯hard to track  people, violence, good hiding places) ­ Almost 10 million people were evicted from slums in a 5 year period.  ­ Difficult to invest in the community, typically very stressful ­ Slums are the first stopping point for immigrants  ▯slums of hope, social mobility,  stepping stone for people to move their way up through society ­ Slums keep the wheels of the city turning  ▯often workers living in these areas,  many times doing jobs people don’t want but need to be done ­ Slums are melting pots ▯ vibrant mixing of cultures because poverty is an  “equalizer” ­ Potential for levels of solidarity  ▯when you don’t have a lot of financial  resources, people rely on one another and build community Low income housing crises: what factors impede construction in cities in the global south?  ­ People themselves may not be investing because theyre afraid theyre going to get  kicked out.  ­ Policy limitations, lack of government capacity or will to supply social housing,  virtually no public housing provision  ­ Financing by the public and private, private can do some development but again  theyre always profit driven and these are low income people. We are increasingly  seeing people financing their housing themselves. Squatting isn’t free and can be  relatively high cost for things like infrastructure  ▯if you don’t have piped water  you may be paying more by having to buy bottled  ­ Planning and zoning  ▯no one does it, or the ways cities have been designed to be  built have not included these things and potentially not allowing people to do  certain things because of these “laws” ▯ can be helpful if they did it because theyre   preparing for growth, they would set out guidelines and provide some services to  enable future community development  ­ Urban growth in the global s
More Less

Related notes for GEOG 3050

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit