Class Notes (838,204)
Canada (510,757)
HTM 2700 (226)
Val Allen (36)
Lecture

Week 8

6 Pages
143 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Hospitality and Tourism Management
Course
HTM 2700
Professor
Val Allen
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 8 Isoelectric Point (IEP) ­ Specific pH where the electrical charge on a protein is neutralized ­ Different pH for each protein  ­ Like charges are not repelling ­ Proteins molecules are very unstable at their IEP  ­ Protein molecules are attracted to each other and form hydrogen bonds with each  other creating larger molecules  ­ Proteins are no longer colloidally dispersed  ­ Precipitate out of colloidal dispersions ­ Sometimes this is something we want (ex: making cheese) ­ Sometimes it’s a ‘culinary catastrophe (ex: curdled soft custard) ­ Proteins in food exist at a pH different from their IEP ­ Therefore, they exist as stable colloidal dispersions (ex: milk has a pH of 6.5­6.7)   (casein proteins in milk have an IEP of pH 4.6)  (if you add vinegar (very acidic) of warm white milk, it will look like there are floating  objects floating around {curdled milk})  Proteins are sensitive to changes in: ­ 1) pH: least stable at their IEP (sensitive to temperature changes) ­ 2) Temperature o particularly increases due to cooking o also decreases (ex: freezing) ­ 3) Mechanical Action­ beating of egg whites o Any of the above results in: o i) denaturation and possibly  o ii) coagulation  Denaturation:  ­ Change from the naturally ordered configuration (shape) of a protein molecule to  a more randomly structured molecule.  ­ Hydrogen bonds are broken (hold the helix configuration)  ­ Peptide bonds are not broken (attach one amino acids to another, do not get  broken during normal cooking activities)  ­ Mechanical actions  Native Protein: ­ Hydrogen bonds between the polypeptide chains Coagulation: ­ Always occurs after denaturation  ­  NEW hydrogen bonds at NEW locations along the protein chain within the  protein molecule ­ NOT reforming the original hydrogen bonds ­ Cause is the same or different from cause of denaturation o Most common cause is heat o Bad Over­Coagulation: ­ Result of prolonged exposure to one of several things such as: o pH change (normally a decrease in pH) o Heat (too high or too long*****) o Mechanical action (least likely) ­ Polypeptide chains compress together and squeeze out H2O because excess  hydrogen bonds form =  ­ SYNERESIS in a GEL ­ CURDLING in a SOL ­ To prevent over­coagulation need to prevent over­heating ­ USE: o A double boiler (top of the stove) OR o Oven poaching (in the oven) o Keep temperatures less than 100 degrees C Food Protein­ Summary: ­ Macromolecules which are polymers of amino acids (8 essential amino acids for  adults) ­ Amino acids in proteins are joined by strong peptide bonds, which are not broken  during normal cooking ­ Proteins in food are colloidally dispersed  ­ Undergo 2 reactions­ denaturation and possibly coagulation (see course pack) ­ Denaturation always occurs first  ­ Coagulation may take place and if it does, it occurs after denaturation  ­ Least stable and most quickly denatured at their IEP ­ Denaturation and possibly coagulation caused by: o Increase in Temperature o Decrease in pH towards IEP which involves adding acids to a recipe o Mechanical action (egg whites only) ­ Over coagulation is a reaction to avoid  ­ Prevent over­coagulation by avoiding over­heating o Use double boiler or oven­poaching ­ Be sure to read the following in the Course Pack: ­ ­ Composition and structure of Eggs and changes in eggs during storage (pdf file  added to courselink homepage) Functional properties of Eggs: ­ Eggs perform 4 main functions in food o Thickeners­ SOL forms  o Gelling agents­ GEL forms o Foaming agents­ egg whites only  o Emulsifiers­ lecithin in egg yolks  Remember the following about Coagulation: ­ Always occurs after denaturation ­ New hydrogen bonds at new location within the protein molecules (along the  polypeptide chain) ­ Not reforming the original hydrogen bonds within the protein structure ­ Cause is the same or different from cause of denaturation o Most common cause is heat Egg as thickeners:  ­ Beating (mechanical action) before cooking, begins the denaturation of the egg  proteins ­ Heat completes the denaturation and causes coagulation ­ Stirring during coagulation decreases the formation of new hydrogen bonds  within the protein molecule (along the polypeptide chain)  o Mixture forms a SOL only, NOT a GEL o Ex: hollandaise sauce for eggs benedict (soft custard in trifle)  Egg as Gelling Agents: ­ Beating (mechanical action) before cooking, begins denaturation of proteins  ­  Heat completes denaturation and causes of coagulation  ­ NO stirring during coagulation allows many new hydrogen bonds to form at new  locations within the protein molecule o 3­dimensional GEL forms o ex: baked custard, poached eggs, quiche Soft vs. Baked Custard (same ingredients, similar amounts, different methods) ­ Soft Custard o Stirred while protein coagulate during heating o Stirring limits number of new hydrogen bonds that form o = SOL (thickened, but still pourable)  ­ Ba
More Less

Related notes for HTM 2700

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit