Class Notes (835,293)
Canada (509,073)
POLS 2000 (43)
Lecture 5

POLS 2000 Week 5 Lecture 1.docx

8 Pages
136 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 2000
Professor
Frank Cameron
Semester
Winter

Description
1 POLS 2000 Lecture Notes October 3, 2013 Lecture 5: Republic Continued • Find out about “The Principle of Specialization”. • Thrasymachus (justice▯self interest).  • Kallipos (justice▯matter of human convention).  • LATE! • The idea that those who blame injustice (as understood by Glaucon), if they do so  because they are too weak to assume the role of a bully themselves.  • Adaemantus: • Would say that a real man does not fear the consequences of injustice.  • His concept of justice centers on self­control.  • At 367a, he says that each individual would be his own God.  • We should not care what others think about us.  • Instead, we should try to develop virtues like autonomy, etc.  • A “City in Speech” is the utopia, or blueprint they are developing.  • The fact that it is “in speech” does not denote actuality.  • Socrates says that you can look at justice in the individual or justice in the city.  • He begins “in the city” because there would be a greater amount of justice in the  city.  • Socrates presupposes an analogy between justice in the city and justice in the soul  (individual) (VERY IMP!!!).  • The city is essentially analogous to the soul.                     Reason 2               Spirited              Appetites • He is saying that the education that we have within a particular polis produces  certain character traits.  • What you want is a “City in Speech” that will produce the desired effect; a just  society.  • By suggesting a “city in Speech” or rule by the philosopher kings, it can be  inferred that Plato is undemocratic.  • Philosopher  Kings         Auxilaries Craftsmen • The rule by the philosopher kings is not a democracy and Socrates is suggesting  that this would be more just; thus, a just society is not necessarily democratic.  • The interesting thing about The Republic is that they are not necessarily rational.  • Socrates says that he wants to reform poetry.  • Homeric poetry should be banned because it will not educate people.  • Education begins with “the auxiliaries”.  • You want to breed courageous, “war­like” souls.  • You want them to be fierce but not too fierce.  • The Gods as depicted in Homer are not virtuous.  • He proposes to reform music because you want a particular kind of music that is  plain and simple.  3 POLS 2000 Lecture Notes October 3, 2013 • Adaemantus says that a city should be simple and provide everything that people  need (food, clothing, etc).  • A city based on necessities.  • Glaucon doesn’t like the idea of a city based on necessities.  • Calls it a “city of pigs”.  • Asks would we really be content to eat from a common trough? • Is there nothing more to politics than to provide the basic necessities?  • Would we want to glorify a nation as a “great society” because it is successful at  providing the basics? • Asks where are the luxuries.  • Socrates calls it a “feverish city”.  • Spirited Soul: • The part of you that craves prestige, esteem.  • Socrates would want to tame this part of the soul through the “just city”.  • Education of the Auxiliaries:  • The censorship that Socrates advocates is partly because poets rely on imitation.  • Education was based on reciting information and it should go beyond this.  • The special skills needed by each person will not develop with resuscitation.  • This will negatively effect the auxiliaries.  • Plato reasoned that if you imitate someone you will develop the character traits  that are present in what you are imitating.  • If a play is emotional, the person imitating it will become emotional (bad for  soldiers).  • Plato says that these imitations should be forbidden to avoid the undesirable  consequences.  • Education in the arts prepares the soul for what Plato calls “correct opinions” or  “correct moral opinions”.  • Only the philosopher kings will possess knowledge.  4 • The education of the auxiliarties will give rise to the knowledge that only the  philosopher kings posess.  • The education of the auxiliaries seeks to reconcile their “gentle side” and their  “spirited side”.  • They should only be allowed to eat boiled roast.  • You do not want to entice them with extravagant food because they will develop a  love for savory dishes.  • You want the food to be as bland as possible so they will eat and be ready to fight.  • The question of education and reform is introduced within a certain context.  • He is introducing them to Glaucon and Adaemantus (two people who can be  persuaded.  • Plato’s “Noble Lie”: • This means that it is important/necessary to deceive people not for nefarious  reasons, but for their own good.  • The telling of lies is admitted as a question of military necessity.  • Divides lies into “good lies” and “bad lies”. 
More Less

Related notes for POLS 2000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit