Class Notes (835,893)
Canada (509,478)
POLS 3130 (158)
Lecture 6

lecture 6 - judicial decision making & the Charter

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 3130
Professor
Dennis Baker
Semester
Winter

Description
Judicial Decision Making  1. A function of what judges prefer to do: Attitudinalists ­why should the preferences of judges trump other actors  2. Constrained by what they perceive is feasible to do: Strategic/rational choice ­reduces legal decisions to games, practicalities of legal decision making ­the need to maximize your own goals, you’d choose an option that somehow  benefits you  ­log rolling, bargaining; a disregard for the doctrine and law  3. Tempered by what they ought to do: Legal role ­adjudication vs mediation, vs arbitration ­interpreters an interstitial lawmakers (when they can be creative because of  ambiguities within the law) ­Dworkin’s Hercules: can make legal decisions consistent, is able to see all of law,  law as integrity ­moral role: there are cases where in order to do what’s right precedents must be  ignored  Legal Reasoning • Precedents are central to common law legal reasoning but they are only part of the  process • Following precedent: case is sufficiently similar to previous cases in the relevant  aspects  • Distinguishing precedent: case is not similar • Ratio decidendi (reasons for the case) vs obitter dicta (things said along the way) ­what is the rule coming out of the precedent that needs to be followed vs  comments made in an editorial fashion that didn’t dictate the case  Statutory Interpretation  • Final legislative intent ­British rule not to look at legislative history, only the text • Primary rules: 1. Literal rule – construe words in their plain meaning  2. Golden rule – if using literal rule would lead to an absurd/inconsistent  conclusion then this should be avoided by looking at the context that the words  appear in  3. Mischief rule – judges ask what was the common law before the legislation and  what defect/mischief did parliament try to address and correct by the legislation  Ontario mushroom co. vs Leary  • Persons employed on a farm are exempt from minimum wage (eggs, milk, grain,  veggies, honey, pigs)  • Technically mushrooms are not vegetables  • Judges used the literal text, since mushrooms are fungi not veggie the exemption  does not apply to them  • Golden rule: the judges didn’t take into account the differences of mushrooms as  fungi or veggies • Mischief rule: seasonal laborers on farms were usually subjected to slave like  labor and wages, the reason for this legislation is to protect them from such work  conditions  S.  1(1) of the Ontario highway traffic act  • Do roller­bladers count as a vehicle or not, allowed on the streets or sidewalks • Importance of the mentioning of “..including muscular power”  ­thinking of bikes which use muscular power, what about other methods of travel  which need the use of muscular powers, how do we control for the dangers  involved, what constitutes enough muscular power to be on the streets R v Cuerrier 1998  • Accused is HIV positive, and lies to his partner about it; does his lying cancel out  consent? • L’Heureux Dube: all lying induce consent vitiates consent  • McLachlin: lying about STDs vitiates consent  ­it would criminalize even the “minor” STDs, results in a criminal charge of  sexual assault  • Cory (and 3 others): lying that results in “substantial risk of bodily harm” vitiates  consent  ­focus more on the serious STDs, HIV included  • R v Mabior (2012): HIV changes ­McLachlin: condom and low viral load = no “substantial risk of serious bodily  harm” • R v Hutchinson (2014): poked holes in the condoms (deception) should this result  in a sexual assault charge  ­court of appeal: consent isn’t given if the “essential quality” of the act is different  from the originally agreed to one ­Mcl. & Cromwell(+2): pregnancy is a “substantial risk of serious bodily harm”  ­vs Abella (+2):  Extra­legal factors  • Preference and strategic decisions  • Public opinion, press opinion, professional opinion (lawyers, legal scholars, elites  in society, people in their circles).  • Who is the audience? Seeing who they are writing for • Article “Time to break for lunch”  Two different approaches to law that affect decision making and judicial reasoning:  Adjudicatory  • Declare the law (interpret and apply law) • Interstitial – some limited room for creativity but results still based largely on  accepted legal principles, deference to legislature  • Pros: ­stability  ­predictability ­rule of law (equal treatment, judge follows rules)  • Cons: ­law can become stagnant ­unfair results can occur ­downplays problems with regular political process Policy Making  • More room for individual creativity and less emphasis on the “law” • A pragmatic judge, thinks if they have the power to ch
More Less

Related notes for POLS 3130

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit